search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INDUSTRY REVIEWNON-RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION


Prospects for individual sectors of the power generation industry very much depend on the particular part of the world


you are talking about. – Joerg Roehl,


Trans Global Projects Group


Trans Global Projects Group (TGP), “prospects for individual sectors of the power generation industry very much depend on the particular part of the world you are talking about”. He explained: “In areas where cost is the


overriding factor, the market for non- renewable power generation is still growing. In developed countries, the renewable energy sector is recording sustainable growth.” Similar points were made by Bahadir


a certain pattern. First, political influences will continue to


P


be the main driver when it comes to investment in the sector. Second, the combined share of new plants using all non-renewable fuels in the worldwide power generation market will increasingly be overtaken by that of renewable energy, particularly wind and solar, both in the developed world and in an ever-growing number of developing countries. When it comes to the individual


www.heavyliftpfi.com


redictions about likely trends in the development of new power generation capacity using non-renewable resources over the next few decades generally follow


non-renewable power plant fuels, gas currently looks set to be the most widely adopted option; nuclear will have a role but remain dogged by uncertainty, with cost and political factors causing frequent project delays and cancellations; coal will steadily lose ground overall but will continue to be deployed in some countries with abundant supplies of that fuel; and the use of oil will be increasingly unattractive. Far less clear at present is exactly how and


at what pace those various trends will play out. The only certainty is that the world will need more power generation capacity using a range of fuels, both renewable and non-renewable. According to Joerg Roehl, ceo Europe for


Erdil, global projects director –USA, and managing director – Turkey, for USA-based Logistics Plus, which has been handling heavy lift and project cargo for coal-fired power plants since it was established more than 20 years ago.


Investment limits “Not all countries and companies can afford to invest in the newest technologies. Although there is a significant increase in renewable power generation globally, we will definitely keep seeing further investment in new plants fuelled by non-renewable resources,” he suggested. That is certainly the case in the


Philippines, for instance, confirmed Elmer Sarmiento, president and ceo of Royal Cargo, which has been involved in a number of coal-fired power plant projects across that country, including GN Power’s Kauswagan project between 2016 and 2018.


May/June 2019 39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166