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INDUSTRYINSIGHT


King Felipe VI of Spain opened this year’s WIndEurope conference and exhibition.


a pivotal year for the offshore industry, particularly in Asia. If governments remain committed, offshore wind will become a truly global market in the next five years.” WindEurope’s Ports Platform,


which brings together ports active (or interested) in Europe’s offshore wind energy sector, said that by 2020, total installed capacity across the continent will reach 28 GW produced by 6,000 turbines. That is set to rise to 49 GW


and 8,000 turbines by 2025, and to 70 GW (10,000 turbines) by 2030. In order to support that growth, ports will need to invest in their facilities and infrastructure. Topping the table for new


Wind energy set to become a ‘truly global market’


The WindEurope conference and exhibition, held in Bilbao from April 2-4, heard that 2018 was a pivotal year for the offshore industry, particularly in Asia. European ports were also told that they will need to invest in their facilities to cope with wind energy growth. Megan Ramsay reports.


T


his year’s WindEurope conference and exhibition saw 8,500 participants,


300 exhibitors and 155 speakers gather in the Spanish city of Bilbao to share knowledge, experience and ideas. Opening the event, King


Felipe VI of Spain said: “It is so highly fitting that the European wind industry should meet here in Spain, a country which for many years has been a leader in wind energy.” Indeed: “Wind energy was


Spain’s second-largest source of electricity generation in 2018, and today we rank fifth worldwide in terms of installed wind power capacity,” he added. The Global Wind Energy


Council (GWEC) used WindEurope as a platform to launch its Global Wind Report 2018, while stating that there were 51.3 GW of new


www.heavyliftpfi.com


installations last year – and forecasts a further 300 GW of new capacity to be added in the next five years. New onshore installations in


2018 accounted for 35 percent of total wind energy installations worldwide. Karin Ohlenforst, GWEC director of market intelligence, said: “2018 was also


If governments remain committed, offshore wind will become a truly global market in the next five years. – Karin Ohlenforst, GWEC


installations last year was China, which led the way for new capacity both onshore and offshore (45 percent and 40 percent respectively of the global total).


Colombia’s targets Other highlights in GWEC’s report include Colombia’s ambition to install 1.5 GW of renewable energy by 2022 Despite the positivity, a


conference session noted that the growth of the wind power generation sector is losing momentum in certain markets. For instance, Europe, already


a mature market for wind energy, is seeing rates of new installation of less than 2 percent a year, while Asia Pacific is pushing ahead with over 6 percent growth in capacity. The EU has set a target for


32 percent of its total power to come from renewable sources by 2030. This is not binding at national level but each member state has now submitted its own plan for increasing the proportion of clean energy in the mix. Besides new installations,


including offshore, repowering of existing onshore sites will enable the generation of more energy from the same area of land using larger, more efficient turbines.


May/June 2019


HLPFI 25


more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


@WIndEurope.


@WIndEurope.


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