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OVERLANDNEWS ROUND-UP more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


Krebs Group receives InterCombi SPEs G


ermany’s Krebs Group has taken delivery of 30 axle lines of Scheuerle InterCombi SPE heavy-duty modules from the TII Group. Detlef Krebs, Krebs Group managing director,


said the InterCombi SPE is “ideally suited” to the company’s core business of transport at shipyards and port facilities in Europe. It now has 90 axle lines from Scheuerle in operation. “The 3 m-wide loading area and the hydraulic axle compensation, in particular, ensure a high


level of safety for the load as well as the vehicle during transportation,” he said. “The coupling capability of the modules across


all vehicle generations shows the flexibility of the vehicle concept and, most importantly, makes it future-proof,” Krebs added.


Pictured right: From left to right: Jörg Neuhäusel, technical director, Krebs Group; owner Detlef Krebs; Bernd Schwengsbier, president TII Sales; and Markus Pflederer, key account manager, TII Sales.


ARTBA highlights poor state of US bridges


The American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) has analysed the US Department of Transportation 2018 National Bridge Inventory (NBI) database and found that 47,052 bridges are classified as structurally deficient and in poor condition. Although the number of


structurally deficient bridges across the USA is down slightly compared with 2017, the pace of improvement has slowed to


the lowest point since ARTBA began compiling its report five years ago. “At the current pace, it would


take more than 80 years to replace or repair the nation’s structurally deficient bridges,” said Alison Premo Black, ARTBA chief economist. “America’s bridge network is


outdated, under-funded and in urgent need of modernisation. “State and local government just have not been given the


AVIATION SECURITY TRAINING FROM THE PRIME


INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION


CALL BIFA TRAINING 0208-844-3625 training@bifa.org www.bifa.org www.heavyliftpfi.com May/June 2019 11


necessary resources to get the job done.” Including structurally


deficient bridges, there are nearly 235,000 bridges – or about 38 percent – in need of some sort of structural repair, rehabilitation or replacement, according to ARTBA’s analysis of the NBI data. The association estimates


the cost to make the identified repairs is nearly USD171 billion.


NEWS in BRIEF


Collett adds tractor unit Collett & Sons has taken delivery of a MAN TGX 26.580 6 x 4 heavy-duty truck. Two more are scheduled to arrive in the near future. The vehicle meets all Euro-6 emission standards and is ready to operate within all Ultra Low Emission Zones (ULEZ) that recently came into effect in London, UK.


BigMove expands fleet BigMove, a European alliance of 13 medium-sized logistics companies, has expanded its fleet with the addition of 19 low-bed semi-trailers. In order to strengthen its network further, BigMove said it plans to focus its investments on semi-trailers and extendible trailers.


Ceva launches BRI train Ceva Logistics North Asia has launched a block train service from China to Europe as the company looks to tap into the potential of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). In cooperation with Xiamen International Railway Service (XMIRS), the block train connects Duisburg, Germany, to Xiamen in the southeast mainland of China.


Hegmann buys low loaders Germany’s Hegmann Transit has added Nooteboom EURO-PX low-loaders and Manoovr semi low-loaders to its fleet. The latest additions to Hegmann’s fleet include several four-axle EURO-PX low-loaders with a two-axle Interdolly, plus five-axle Manoovr extendible semi low-loaders with excavator troughs and 80-tonne ramps.


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