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ADVERTORIALSTAR SHIPPING


Star Shipping takes a keen interest in the


China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, which aims to benefit Pakistan, China and other countries in the region by improving road, rail and air transportation links and promoting academic, cultural and business ties.


A recent example of cooperation with


China saw Star Shipping handle a consignment of Sany and Komatsu hydraulic excavators and trucks, as well as accessories, from Shanghai and Tianjin to Karachi port.


Engine transport Star Shipping also handled the transportation and logistics, including rigging and erection support, of a 110-tonne Wartsila engine measuring 9.70 m x 2.20 m x 3.65 m for Yunus Brothers in Karachi. “The movement of the engine from Port


Shipping’s scope of work. With own equipment managed by RS


Transportation – a group company – Star Shipping has at its disposal a fleet including multi-axle hydraulic trailers, heavy low-bed trailers, flat-bed trailers and hydraulic cranes. Its latest development sees the launch of


a new business division, offering land route surveys in Pakistan, which is a gateway to booming markets in the Subcontinent, Middle East and Central Asia. In all urban, rural, hilly and remote areas of Pakistan, Star Shipping can provide any required geometric surveys of key areas along the delivery routes.


Networks member As a member of the international groups Project Cargo Network, Global Project Logistics Network and the WCA Projects Network, Star Shipping is well used to collaborating with customers and business partners around the world. Its vast experience has seen Star Shipping


plan and execute an offshore project to ship a hull and superstructure crane, handle delicate wind power components and co- ordinate the relocation of a 24 MW power plant from Colombo, Sri Lanka, to Karachi, Pakistan. Recently, the company carried out a


cross-trade project involving a breakbulk shipment from Shanghai to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, for onward transportation. The consignment comprised 12 pieces of cargo with a combined weight of 1,415 tonnes. “All deliveries were completed safely and


securely thanks to the due diligence of Star Shipping’s logistics team and partners involved,” said a proud Muhammad Kamran, Star Shipping director.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Qasim to the Korangi Industrial Area in Karachi was challenging,” said Kamran, pointing to the difficulties of moving such a large piece through one of Pakistan’s busiest cities while at the same time negotiating heavy traffic and low bridges. Road clearance permissions and non-


scheduled electric shutdowns were taken in order to deliver the engine to the client’s site. On arrival, the unloading was successfully and safely performed by a jacking/skidding method to avoid expensive heavy-duty cranes. Kamran recalled another particularly


memorable project, involving the delivery of cargoes for a hydro power project in a remote corner of Pakistan. The consignment for the 1.6 MW Hajira


project comprised one flat-rack and six high- cube containers, which arrived at the port of Karachi. There were different heavy


No other transport providers or logistics companies took the risk of this project, due to the road restrictions, landsliding on the route and the risk of vehicle or cargo loss on the mountains. –Muhammad Kamran, Star Shipping


packages to haul, though due to the capacity of the power project the heaviest cargo weighed only 15 tonnes. The challenge in this instance was nature,


rather than weight. Owing to a landslide and poor road conditions at the final destination, it was necessary for the Star team to store the cargo at Tarnol, southeast of the Pakistani capital Islamabad.


Project challenges Star Shipping engineers then learnt the road to the Hajira site was blocked from a distance of 30 miles. In order to perform delivery, they had to construct their own access roads, cutting rocks as they went. It was necessary to hire earth-moving machinery including excavators and cranes to clear the landslides on roads, and lift the packages onto the narrow and blocked turnings. The site access road was also restricted,


prompting Star Shipping to employ a small 4 x 4 truck to haul a 15-tonnes turbine onto a rocky track with sharp turnings and 45 degree slopes. After a delay of ten days, the cargo was successfully delivered to Hajira, much to the appreciation of the client. Kamran said: “This project was located in


a remote area of Pakistan, close to the Indian border at Poonch, and required the use of skidding ropes, jacks and excavators. “No other transport providers or logistics


companies took the risk of this project, due to the road restrictions, landsliding on the route and the risk of vehicle or cargo loss on the mountains. “Star Shipping’s daredevil operation team


took the lead of the whole logistics operation and delivered the complete project machinery to the job site. This project was notable for its extremely distant location, and for the risk involved. “For us, it was business as usual.”


HLPFI


CONTACTS: Star Shipping Pvt Ltd, Karachi Tel: +92 21 32620750 Mob: +92 300 8228830 karachi@starship.com.pk www.starship.com.pk


May/June 2019 141


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