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COUNTRY REPORTCANADA


to execute this side of the project.” One current project for Ambercor is for an


operator in the Alberta oilsands. It has required 120 containers, 40 to 50 flatracks, and 60 breakbulk shipments. Cargoes have landed at Houston and Freeport in Texas, and at Tacoma, Washington, for the long land haul to central Alberta. Project cargo shipments have included items


up to 21 ft (6.4 m) wide and 120,000 lbs (68 tonnes), said Wagner. “In one case the plan was to ship a load from Europe to British Columbia. But because of a change in the manufacturing schedule, the optimum ocean leg was to Houston. That shrank ocean time, but increased landside, which is also more expensive.


But it put us back in the game for the project schedule. Everyone was able to adjust.” Ambercor has also moved coal-handling


equipment and electrical transformers, as well as some equipment for upgrades at steel mills in Canada. The firm is also involved in the Molson Brewery project outside Montreal. One of the more unusual projects has been replacing the boarding bridges at Toronto’s Lester B Pearson International Airport. “This is what we do,” said Wagner, “not so


much the major projects but revamps and upgrades in steel, coal, petrochemical, power and brewing. Of course, we do hope to be involved in the Kitimat LNG project. We have ties to one of the possible pipe manufacturers.”


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them four at a time. Tying them together also made them more stable in transit.” The system worked so well it will be used at another new Molson Brewery project outside Montreal.


New forwarder In a back-to-the-future moment, one of the newest project freight forwarders in Canada is Ambercor Shipping. President Gerald Hess, and vice presidents Christian Wagner and Marcel Hafemann, co-founded Albacor Shipping in 1998. That grew to 20 offices in four countries before it was acquired by BNSF Logistics in 2012. To varying degrees, the partners stayed with BNSF until reuniting to found Ambercor in 2018. It has offices in Toronto, Calgary and New York. “There are lots of smaller


projects across the USA and Canada, and a lot of forwarders in Europe that struggle with local moves in North America,” said Wagner. “They just have not had regular partners in North America


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