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COUNTRY REPORTCANADA


uptick in work for renewable energy cargoes – particularly wind – in Alberta. “We used to do some wind farms in [the province of] Ontario, but this year and next it is mostly Alberta. We are also doing hydroelectric projects. People sometimes forget hydro is renewable – we have been involved in dam projects for years. We have also done a bit for mining projects in British Columbia.” This is not to say that Eastern Canada has


been idle. Indeed, the current largest project in the country is the replacement of the Pont Champlain bridge that spans the St Lawrence River into Montreal. The 1962-built steel-truss cantilever bridge is being replaced with a cable-stayed bridge and is scheduled for completion this summer. The project is similar to the replacement of the Tappan Zee bridge across the Hudson River north of New York City, which was completed last year. The Champlain Bridge replacement is a


showcase project for Bellemare Group, based in Trois Rivieres, Quebec. “This is the biggest construction project in North America,” said Kevin Kwateng, director of heavy haul operations. “Those types of job usually go to the Mammoets and the Sarens of the world. We moved about 4,000 girders, each weighing 60-70 tonnes, that were assembled into 300 ft (91.4 m) beams.”


Pressure vessel move Separately, Bellemare has just completed its first move of a pressure vessel from Canada to the USA – a reactor for Marathon Petroleum’s refinery at Detroit. “It was 350,000 lbs (158.8 tonnes), and


we handled the entire logistics process,” said Kwateng. “We hired the barge and handled all the loading, welding, balancing and ballasting, through to offloading and delivery. It was our first big project with offloading in the USA. We now have our feet on American soil.” Kwateng said his company was able to


win and complete such projects in competition with global majors because of its local knowledge and capabilities. “We have a yard just 15 minutes away and we know how to work with the local unions. On lump-sum projects, time is the enemy. Local personnel, equipment, and knowledge reduce downtime.” On the equipment side, Bellemare has


added 40 axle lines of SPMTs, and converted its entire fleet to bio-oils for fuels and hydraulics. “The bigger firms have not wanted to do that because they could not easily convert their whole fleet, and do not want to mix and risk contamination.” Bellemare operates in two divisions. One


138 May/June 2019


Increasingly, Omega Morgan is taking on projects end to end.


handles over-the-road shipments across North America up to 15 axles. The other does heavy haulage and rigging in Ontario, Quebec, and Canada’s Maritime provinces. While taking a hand in wind energy, Bellemare is also active in several public transport projects in Eastern Canada. That includes tunnel-boring machines (TBM) and electrical equipment that must be installed underground.


Coal activity If there has not been a lot of equipment moved into or around Canada for coal mining, there certainly is activity in coal loading. In August 2018, Nickel Brothers completed a series of three projects to replace major equipment at the Westshore Coal Terminal just to the south of Vancouver. It is a major export facility for US-mined coal from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The equipment includes stacker reclaimers, bucket wheels and shiploaders. Nickel Brothers is also working on


similar projects for Neptune Terminals within the port of Vancouver. Neptune handles coal and potash; the latter is one of the major exports for Canada. In several cases the coal handling equipment was


partially fabricated in China and finished at Supreme Steel in Canada. Supreme is also providing components


for the one oil pipeline that is progressing, the expansion of the Trans Mountain line from Edmonton to Burnaby, British Columbia, near Vancouver. “We have moved 20 to 30 components, some of significant dimensions,” said Timothy Nickel, general manager of the company’s industrial division. Broadly, he noted: “As oil and gas projects have declined, there has still been work in potash, and some expansion in grain and coal, even cement.” The core business for Nickel Brothers is


ro-ro projects using barges. “In that we exceed any other carrier on the water,” claimed Timothy Nickel. Landside, “we offer factory-to-foundation projects including installation on site. In this business there is a major gap between delivery and installation. If we handle the whole thing, the risk of standby falls on us.” An interesting challenge was installing


new kettles at Molson’s newest and largest brewery in Chilliwack, 60 miles (96.6 km) up the Fraser River from Vancouver. “We used a different system and moved the tanks in groups,” said Timothy Nickel. “The building had a low ceiling, so we installed


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