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COUNTRY REPORTCANADA


said Mammoet’s MacLeod. “The government is providing royalty credits to build on raw materials that are available.” For decades, the province has mostly


exported hydrocarbons. The only downstream processing has been Nova olefins and polymers complex at Joffre, about halfway between Calgary and Edmonton. There has also been some gas-based fertiliser production. The first project under the diversification


programme is already under way. “We have brought in a PTC 35 ring crane to erect towers for the Inter Pipeline Company polymers complex near Fort Saskatchewan,” said MacLeod. Called the Heartland Petrochemical Complex, it will convert propane, a natural gas liquid that is oversupplied in the province, into 525,000 tonnes per year of polypropylene –a commodity plastic most familiar in food-storage containers. The big lifts in the CAD3.5 billion


(USD2.61 billion) project are three process towers for propane dehydrogenation, purification and polymerisation. The facility is scheduled to come online in 2021 near Inter Pipeline’s existing Redwater olefinic fractionator.


Final investment decision


Another similar project is being planned by the Canadian Kuwaiti Petrochemical joint venture. The final investment decision (FID) has been made, and MacLeod said that Mammoet will be an eager bidder once the process starts. “Over the past few years the entire


industry has gone through a downturn,” MacLeod added. “We have actually been shedding some cranes and trailers to other parts of North America and the rest of the world. Only recently have we thought about adding assets again.” That could be moving some back, building or buying. Mammoet has two PTC 35s as well as


two PTC 210s in its global fleet, along with other large cranes. The pool is managed worldwide out of the its Utrecht office in the Netherlands. While most of the oil and gas


development in Canada to date has been in Alberta, there is also a growing segment in British Columbia. That, too, has to contend with rugged mountains and vast distances to get the molecules to market. Beyond oil and gas, there has been some


development in coal and power that has generated project cargo handling opportunities. Mammoet has done some work for the mining sector in the Crowsnest Pass area of British Columbia. “There is also


www.heavyliftpfi.com


We used to do some wind farms in [the province of] Ontario, but this year and next it is mostly Alberta. We are also doing hydroelectric. – Erik Zander, Omega Morgan


Nickel Brothers completed three projects last year to replace major equipment at the Westshore Coal Terminal to the south of Vancouver.


a significant amount of work in large turbines for wind power,” added MacLeod. “We have a dedicated business development team solely for wind energy across North America. The major areas for development are West Texas, the US Midwest, and the Pacific Northwest, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and into southern Alberta.” Given the diversity of projects, MacLeod


added that his firm “continues to add dollars to research and development.” During April, Mammoet confirmed that it is moving forward with the development of its Focus crane concept, which it claims will be the ideal heavy lift solution for projects in


confined spaces. “It is similar to our ring cranes but with a


smaller footprint. It is being designed specifically for heavy work in places like older refineries where there are tight spaces within the existing pressure vessels and pipe racks.” Mammoet said that the Focus crane is likely to be available in the second quarter of 2020. Even if there are not yet new pipeline


projects, midstream companies are doing their best to de-bottleneck existing capacity. “We just finished a number of moves for new or upgraded gas compressors,” said Zander at Omega Morgan. “We hauled them from the manufacturer in California to northeastern British Columbia using nine-axle Cozad trailers, then cross-loaded to a Faymonville trailer to back into the building.”


End-to-end projects Increasingly Omega Morgan is taking on projects end to end. “We have built our company on turnkey work, typically inland,” said Zander. “I personally see a lot of value in 3PLs, and we like working with them. We do not chase a lot of ocean freight. We prefer to let the 3PLs handle that. They do a good job and we can focus on services when the load arrives, from trucking to jacks or cranes on site through to installation.” On the export side, Omega Morgan has


already been working on crating and other preparations for project loads destined for overseas. “Potentially we are looking at meeting them on the other side as well,” Zander added. “That can minimise cost and risk. I have yet to see a trucking company that is also handling the offloading to then charge the shipper standby if its own truck is late.” Omega Morgan is also reporting an


May/June 2019 137


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