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COUNTRY REPORTCANADA


As the replacement of a major bridge in Montreal is completed, a landmark LNG project on the West Coast begins. In between are upgrades and expansions to coal terminals and breweries. Gregory DL Morris discusses the opportunities on offer for the country’s project logistics sector.


2.5 billion acres. On and under that few billion acres are some of the world’s richest natural resources: oil, gas, coal, precious and industrial metals, inorganics, and timber. All of that needs extracting and processing, which means machinery and heavy industry. The lack of major navigable rivers means the land transport side of heavy lift and project cargo often comes to the fore. Even when projects are


V


developed at the coast, there is often little


oltaire notoriously dismissed Canada as “quelques arpents de neige,” a few acres of snow. It is actually 3.6million sq miles (9.9 million sq km), which is about


between sea and cedar. A case in point is Canada’s latest major industrial development. An international consortium of energy companies, led by global energy major Shell, is just starting site preparation at Kitimat, British Columbia, for the world-scale LNG Canada complex.


Kitimat development Kitimat is 400 miles (643.7 km) north from Vancouver, opposite the Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands). Rio Tinto Alcan has a large aluminum smelter there, but there is no commercial industrial port and no formal port authority. The Shell consortium, and its contractor


group led by EPCs Fluor and JGC, plan to build the LNG train as modules with final


assembly on site. That means heavy lift ships navigating 60 miles (96.6 km) up a twisting arm of Queen Charlotte Sound from the Pacific Ocean, and challenging landings on what is today mostly shingle. The owners and contractors will have to


build a port before they can build a plant. At the time of writing, all of the major


heavy lift and project cargo companies active in Western Canada were expecting formal requests for proposal (RFP) by the end of April, with awards for the initial work going out in May or June. “Everyone is getting their ducks in a row


for Kitimat,” stated Erik Zander, director of sales at Omega Morgan. “LNG is the number one project on the horizon,” said Tom MacLeod, commercial


Nickel Brothers’ core business is ro-ro project cargo shipments using barges.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


May/June 2019


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