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REGIONAL REPORTSOUTHEAST ASIA


Philippines-based Geo Transport used a MAN 8x4 prime mover combined with a Faymonville four-axle MegaMAX lowbed


trailer to transport one of the largest cranes in its fleet, a Tadano RT GR1450-EX.


problems with the country’s over-reliance on coal-fired generation, with its ‘outdated’ planning appearing to lock in baseload coal with little ambition for adding greener alternatives. In fact, IEEFA noted that Indonesian government policies are discouraging the wider introduction of solar energy in the country.


Push for renewables The global and political push for renewables means that these countries will have to develop an increasing number of projects in the longer term, said Panayides. “But we are talking about thousands of islands – it is hard to put the infrastructure in place to support such projects.” Penny Estrada, overseas business


development director at the Philippines- based All Systems Logistics (ASL), said: “Since the Philippines comprises 7,107 islands, lack of infrastructure has been and still is the biggest challenge for project and heavy lift cargo shipments. Even for general cargo that involves multiple containers or multimodal transport, it can get technical due to equipment availability, weather conditions and varying local policies for Customs clearance. “Furthermore, as the economy grows,


demand for materials in more remote islands is also increasing – and so is the imbalance between imports/exports for international and domestic cargo. It takes a lot of experience, good contacts with suppliers and local knowledge to complete


www.heavyliftpfi.com


projects for the archipelago seamlessly.” ASL has seen projects stall after the


research or bidding stages because the overall costs were too high, or the paperwork/processes were going to take too long, said Estrada. “For Southeast Asia as a region, even some major ports [exceptions including Singapore, Port Klang and Hong Kong] are still considered to be ‘outports’ requiring high freight inducement.” ASL, which is 100 percent Filipino


owned, has ten offices across the country, with most of its project cargo division staff based at its Manila headquarters. Last year was not as busy as in previous


years because ASL is primarily involved in renewable energy, food production and government defence projects, said Estrada. “We participated in many bids in renewable energy and government projects that are promising; however, the turnover and completion of these will take another three to five years. Such is the nature of these projects, another consideration when we provide our solutions.” Estrada is predicting busy years ahead


For Southeast Asia as a region, even some major ports are still considered to be ‘outports’ requiring high


freight inducement. – Penny Estrada, ASL


NEWS in BRIEF


Blue Circle and AC Energy to build 1,500 MW of renewables


Blue Circle and AC Energy plan to develop 1,500 MW of wind energy projects in Southeast Asia, including 700 MW in Vietnam. Construction on a 200 MW Vietnamese project is scheduled to start this year. AC Energy, which is a subsidiary of Ayala Corp, has earmarked USD100 million of equity to fund projects with Blue Circle in 2019. Blue Circle said that it also has projects under development in the Philippines and Indonesia, as well as in Laos, and will work with AC Energy to bring them to energy production.


TechnipFMC wins Merakes deal TechnipFMC was awarded an integrated engineering, procurement, construction, transportation and installation contract by Eni in March for the Merakes project. Located offshore Balikpapan, Indonesia, at a water depth of approximately 1,500 m, this contract covers five deepwater wells, plus a 50 km long tie-back to the existing Jangkrik floating production unit in Indonesia.


Repsol strikes off Indonesia Repsol made a significant gas discovery in Sumatra, Indonesia during February. It is estimated to hold over 250 million barrels of oil equivalent, which would make it the largest gas discovery in Indonesia since ExxonMobil’s Cepu discovery in 2001.


May/June 2019 113


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