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REGIONAL REPORTSOUTHEAST ASIA


AAL discharged two giant ‘cyclone vessels’ (each measuring approximately 22 m x 11 m x 10 m and weighing over 500 tonnes) at Petronas’ USD27 billion RAPID project in Malaysia. The two cyclone or ‘tertiary’ vessels were loaded onto AAL Fremantle in Mailiao, Taiwan, using the ship’s combined 700-tonne lifting capacity cranes. The units were discharged in Tanjung Setapa, ahead of their installation at Petronas’ RAPID project in Pengerang, southern Johor.


been seeing levels grow,” said Panayides. “For us, Indonesia and Vietnam are the


most significant generators of cargo, but all of the core Southeast Asia countries are within our schedules and our reach.”


Frequent sailings AAL operates frequent sailings for regular cargo, complemented by semi-liner services that are flexible in terms of schedules and port calls. It also offers calls on inducement. A key development is in the energy


sector. “Oil and gas projects used to be our bread and butter, but over the last three years there has not been any real capital expenditure because of the low [oil] price. But now it is coming back and that is good


www.heavyliftpfi.com


news for our industry. We are all expecting that 2019, and especially 2020, will start to see new demand from the oil and gas sector as new projects come onstream.” A total of 47 crude and natural gas


projects have started or are due to start in 2018-25 across the key Southeast Asia markets – 25 are still in the early stages, while 22 have identified project plans, said Panayides. Indonesia leads with the most announced projects. Panayides described renewable energy as


a challenge. He believes that while renewables projects increase elsewhere, there is likely to be a reduction in Southeast Asia. The Philippines and Indonesia are huge countries with massive populations but


the landscape and lack of infrastructure are holding back renewable energy projects compared, for example, with Europe. “Coal will remain one of the main


sources of energy production,” added Panayides. “Renewables will not grow in terms of percentages. Hydropower will have the best potential, including in Cambodia and Laos. Wind power should have high potential but the lack of financial support, experience and expertise in renewable energy are a challenge; the lack of policies in place is another reason.” The Institute for Energy Economics and


Financial Analysis (IEEFA) recently observed that Indonesia’s Electricity Supply Business Plan 2019 did little to address


May/June 2019 111


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