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1 01/05/2019 13:22:59


significantly broadened the insurable risk. Provisions such as selling price valuation and control of damaged goods/fear of loss/brand protection have increased the number of cargo claims.” IUMI said insurance


premiums are not currently risk adequate to cover losses and expenses.


General average C.H. Robinson added that general average declarations are becoming more and more of a headache for risk managers and insurers, owing to the rise in frequency of fires on vessels, as well as more common, and more severe, extreme weather events. As general average


declarations have become more frequent, liens imposed by shipowners have also been increasing, going up from about 12 percent in 2017 to about 50 percent just a year later. However, measures for


greater transparency – such as random vessel inspections and digitalisation of maritime transport – are steps in the right direction, IUMI observed. It highlighted the Global


Smart Containers Alliance in Asia, which seeks to “combine the knowledge and information from component and system suppliers together with the leading shipping operators of the world to transmit data over GSM networks as well as through satellite communication,” as one example. The organisation also called


for better protection against onboard fires, as well as more adequate firefighting equipment on vessels. “In remote locations and on


the open sea, it can often be hours or even days after a fire has broken out before external assistance arrives. As a rule, only seagoing tugs carry the necessary equipment for effective firefighting. Until they arrive, the crew has to rely on its own resources and the fire can spread extensively,” IUMI’s position paper stated.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


International transport and


logistics insurer TT Club believes that the campaign for greater safety must focus first on dangerous goods. TT Club’s records indicate


that across the intermodal spectrum as a whole, 66 percent of incidents related to cargo damage can be attributed to poor practice in the overall packing process; that is not just in securing but also in cargo identification, declaration, documentation and effective data transfer. Container lines, in particular,


are making efforts to mitigate the problem.


Problem commodities The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS), in which many of the top lines participate, has been active for a number of years and has successfully identified a number of commodities that commonly cause problems during transport – not always limited to those formally identified as dangerous. TT Club, together with UK P&I Club and Exis Technologies, has additionally promoted the Hazcheck Restrictions Portal, which is designed to identify and streamline the complexity of regulations and protocols imposed by carriers and ports around the world in relation to transporting declared dangerous goods. However, as Peregrine


Storrs-Fox, risk management director, TT Club, concluded: “There is very much still to be done in achieving true cargo integrity. Our diverse campaign is seeking significant cultural and behavioural change, to say the least. Certain elements may require legislative action, enforcement and inspection and there are great challenges in the field of technological development. Above all, there is a need for all involved in the supply chain to have a realistic perception of risk and a responsible attitude towards liability.”


HLPFI May/June 2019 109


+353 47 80500


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