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INDUSTRY REVIEWCIVIL ENGINEERING


planned – before the lifting operation was completed.” Elsewhere in the USA, there was considerable


anticipation surrounding President Trump’s USD1.5 trillion infrastructure spending plan announced in early 2018. However, Erik Zander, director of sales at Oregon-based Omega Morgan, said new projects are yet to materialise. “Engineering and state agencies continue with


designs so they have shovel-ready projects when funding hits, but we have yet to see any trickle-down effect from the earmarked funds,” he noted. Operating in the Pacific Northwest, Omega


Morgan specialises in heavy rigging and machinery moving. Zander said project


complexity is “definitely increasing due to congestion that you did not have 40-50 years ago when this infrastructure was initially put in place. “This congestion forces the engineering and


construction companies to figure out how to build a project with a limited available footprint,” he added. Overall, he said the civil market in the USA


and Canada remains relatively flat. However, he noted renewables projects are “rocking, as well as the associated infrastructure to support these projects”. This was a point also raised by Belgian heavy


lift giant Sarens. “Take the example of Taiwan,” the firm’s spokeswoman said. “There is a major trend of


“From a heavy lift perspective,


the removal of an old bridge will usually be a higher value operation than installing the new one. Particularly in the USA, construction, extension or renovation of stadiums and airports also continue to be a growing market.”


Stadium renovation Indeed, a USD50 million stadium renovation in the city of Milwaukee saw ALE raise a roof section weighing 400 tonnes, from 11.9 m to 19.8 m. “There was minimal space available at the site, so we devised a jacking solution using eight strand jacks,” explained Martinez. “One unexpected challenge on


the project was the weather, which was more severe than usual for the area. Temperatures fell to -30°C overnight and temporarily prevented the client from continuing welding work. “Our solution enabled the roof


section to be securely held in place, with the weight supported for almost two weeks – three times longer than originally


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Fracht in Africa


Burundi, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Mauritius, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia.


www.fracht.com frachtafrica@frachtag-bs.ch


May/June 2019


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