search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS&VIEWS You Can Use


Lillis Wins Godolphin Award Long-time Maryland T oroughbred Horse-


men’s Association Benevolence Administrator Bobby Lillis was awarded the 2019 Godolphin T oroughbred Industry Employee Community Award. T is award recog- nizes those in the industry with outstanding talent, diligence and commit- ment to the sport of T or- oughbred horse racing. T e Community Award is for those who have made outstanding contributions to the industry and who contribute to the greater good of the sport. Lillis said, “Winning this


award is simply beyond my wildest dreams. I am truly grateful that my work ethic and my voice in representing our backstretch workers over my many years in horse racing is being recognized with this most prestigious Godolphin TIEA Community Award.” In addition to his work with MTHA, Lillis is a staple presenter at the Sunrise at Old Hilltop tours at Pimlico each year.


Balsamo Pleads Guilty in Theft Case On September 4, former Humane Society


of Wicomico County director Aaron Balsamo pleaded guilty to one count of theft scheme. Balsamo has been on administrative leave since August 2018 when investigation into his mis- use of agency money began. Criminal sum- mons for Balsamo was issued in February of this year and he was indicted on April 1 on the charge of theft scheme between $25,000 and $100,000. Court documents state that he used an agency credit card to make several thousand dollars in personal purchases. Kim Nock is the new executive director of the Humane Society of Wicomico County.


Renovations to Potomac Horse Center Begin


After several fundraising activities, the Friends of Potomac Horse Center Capital Campaign chair Stacie Benes and Potomac Horse Center manager Renee Terselic announced on August 26 that all necessary funds to repair the roof on


the New School Arena have been raised. T e $75,000 raised by PHC was matched by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. T is is the fi rst phase in a multi- year eff ort to raise $1 million needed to refurbish the entire PHC facility.


New TRF Sanctuary Opens in Maryland


On September 15, the


Bobby Lillis wins the 2019 Godolphin Thoroughbred Industry Employee Community Award


newest T oroughbred Re- tirement Foundation sanctu- ary opened at Renaissance Farm in Taneytown. T is is the second TRF sanctuary in Maryland. Five horses have moved into their new home at Renaissance Farm with the goal of raising visibility for T oroughbred aftercare,


retired racehorses’ potential for second careers and fundraising for the work of TRF. T e fi ve horses residing at Renaissance Farm


are Son of a General, Sonny’s the One, Mighty Tuff , Green Shoots and Zyxt. T ese horses will serve as teachers to educate the dynamic and diverse horse community in Maryland.


AAEP Published EIA Guidelines T e American Association of Equine Practi-


tioners (AAEP) has published a list of guide- lines providing the most current information on diagnostics, transmission, risk factors, con- trol and biosecurity strategies for Equine Infec-


tious Anemia (EIA). EIA is a viral disease with no cure and no vaccine for prevention. Horses that are confi rmed with EIA through a Cog- gins test must be quarantined for the remainder of their lives but are typically euthanized. T e AAEP guidelines focus on recent changes in the epidemiology of the disease in the US. For a link to the complete list of guidelines, go to equiery.com.


Rutledge Tops Plantation 4* On September 22, Frederick native Colleen


Rutledge and her homebred Covert Rights galloped around the cross-country course at the Plantation Field International to win the CCI4*-S division. Rutledge lead at the start of the competi-


tion scoring a 26.3 in dressage on the fi rst day. T e next day, they dropped to third place when one rail fell in show jumping. Erin Sylvester and Paddy the Caddy moved into the top spot and Caroline Martin moved into second riding Danger Mouse after show jumping. With only cross-country left to go on Sunday,


Rutledge and “CR” put in a double clean round while the leaders had some troubles moving Rutledge into the winning position. “He felt like a rockstar. T ere aren’t words to describe how happy I am,” Rutledge said of her 13-year- old T oroughbred/Clydesdale cross. As of press time, Rutledge and CR are entered in this year’s Fair Hill International CCI4*-L.


WHERE’S WANDA?


Want to win tickets to this year’s Washington Inter- national Horse Show or Fair Hill International? Be the fi rst person to fi nd Wanda hidden in the October issue and you can be a winner! You must CALL T e Equiery at 1-800-244-9580 between 9am and 5pm by October 9 with the page number that Wanda is hidden on to have tickets mailed to you. And no, this page does not count! Hint... the Wanda hidden in


this issue looks like the one on this page. First call wins! Happy hunting. And don’t forget to follow T e Equiery on Facebook and be added to our email list


for more chances to win tickets to WIHS and FHI. Hope to see all of you at this year’s shows! Look for T e Equiery at WIHS’s Barn Night and FHI’s cross-country day!


IF YOU HAVE NEWS, VIEWS OR UPDATES TO CONTRIBUTE, PLEASE SEND THEM TO THE EDITOR at


The Equiery, P.O. Box 610, Lisbon, MD 21765 • FAX: 410-489-7828 • email editor@equiery.com. Be sure to include your full name, phone number and address. All submissions become the property of The Equiery.


www.equiery.com | 800-244-9580 OCTOBER 2019 | THE EQUIERY | 9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68