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hen HERB LIEBERMAN left the Army in 1957, he became the third generation of Lieberman’s to operate the Lakenor Scrap Metal & Auto Wrecking Company in Santa Fe Springs, CA. The company soon modernized and went from what Lieberman calls a junk- yard to a full-service recycling business specializing in Cadillacs and Chevys, and, as he says, “building a two-story modern office building that looks more like a bank than a salvage yard.” Lieberman, now 78, is proud of taking the company into the modern age, going to a five-day work week, providing a profit shar- ing plan for all employees, full paid health insurance for employees and their families, and growing the business from two employees (his father and grand- father) to 69 employees – many of which have been with the firm for over 17 years.


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Herb Lieberman


Lieberman soon be- came involved in the Automotive Dismantlers Association of Southern California, as well as the ARA, working his way through the executive committee to become ARA president in 2001. He also was named Dismantler of the Year by the State of California Auto Dismantlers Association. Still involved full-time with LKQ, he sees an indus-


try facing challenges from the telematics, autonomous vehicles and the electronic accident avoidance sys- tems.


The company was bought out by LKQ in 1999, and he took on a corporate role in the company in differ- ent roles as Inter- and Intra-Industry Liaison at LKQ Corporation.


industry’s first multi-terminal online yard manage- ment system. It was founded in 1976 and was the first successful yard management system with more than


H


OWARD NUSBAUMstarted his recycler-suppli- er career as founder of AutoInfo, which was the


Septemeber-October 2016 | Automotive Recycling 39


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