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Working in travel Seas the day


The growing cruise industry offers oceans of opportunities


Cruise ships are like floating hotels, so getting a job should be plain sailing. Hospitality skills from restaurants, casinos, bars and hotels are transferable, and guest services departments also require hotel or resort experience. Likewise, entertainers, nannies, gym and dive instructors and spa staff can be recruited with experience from land-based roles. Other positions available include


electrical engineers, environmental officers, security staff and lifeguards,


as well as the ship’s captain and navigation officer. Cruise trade body Clia UK &


Ireland says there is a “wealth of apprenticeship schemes” across marine, technical and hospitality positions. It supports cruise programmes at Plymouth and Southampton Solent universities. Andy Harmer, Clia UK & Ireland


director and senior vice-president for membership and director, advises jobseekers to research the industry, adding: “Look at where your skillset, qualifications and interests lie before


getting in touch with the cruise lines’ dedicated careers teams.” Cruise lines’ online portals offer advice and links to recruitment agencies. Note, however, that there are warnings about scams and fraudulent recruiters. Royal Caribbean has launched


internships through a partnership with the University of Chester. Danielle Grant, HR manager UK&I


at Royal Caribbean, says: “There are more than 300 types of jobs onboard – and that’s before you consider head office opportunities.


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