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A World of Options Delivering Travel


throughout by finding solutions to issues, including schedules, flight and accommodation changes, and local emergencies.


Pilots and cabin crew As well as being able to fly an aircraft, a pilot needs to understand issues such as air-traffic control, meteorology, navigation and aircraft systems. Cabin crew roles cover a varied brief including health and safety, dealing with passengers, serving food and drink, and dealing with emergencies.


Ports Ports such as Liverpool, Southampton, Newcastle and Dover are constantly developing. Roles may vary slightly, but in general, there will be business areas that need to be looked after such as freight and cargo, the environment and cruise. The port, as a business, also needs to be managed, so that it makes a profit and attracts new business. Many ports also have external affairs teams that deal with the government, media and other outside organisations. There’s a huge technical side that includes roles such as engineers. All


ports have harbour masters and operations teams including terminal managers. They will also have a head office that deals with business aspects.


Rail The likes of Eurostar and Virgin Trains employ drivers, stewards, catering staff and train managers. They also employ ground staff such as those who look after check-in. In addition, there are head-office roles in operations, business planning, sales, communications, web, reservations, finance, HR and legal. There are also technical roles for engineers and mechanics.


Reps Representatives, or reps, work in resort and are a first point of contact for holidaymakers. Work is usually seasonal, but reps can switch from summer sun to ski resorts to work year- round, or travel to a different part of the world. It’s a great first step into the travel industry and reps often have to deal with a wide range of situations, from greeting customers to dealing with complaints and accidents.


Resorts Resorts include hotels, but also offer a wide range of


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opportunities in activity-based roles. As well as hotel staff, there are entertainers, kids’ club reps and sports coaches. Office staff are responsible for management, operations, reservations, maintenance and marketing.


Summer camps Summer camps are an American tradition and working at one with a company such as Camp America is a great way to experience different cultures, meet people from around the world and dip your toe into the travel and tourism industry. Roles include looking after children, teaching activities and helping run the camp. Placements are generally for nine weeks, and staff will have the opportunity to travel around the US for up to 30 days afterwards.


Theme parks and attractions On the ground, there are ride operators, shop staff and customer-facing employees. Most parks and attractions have marketing, hospitality and visitor service roles, as well as people looking after group visits from schools and enthusiasts’ clubs. Many venues also have conference


facilities. As well as standard head-office functions such as web development, marketing, HR and legal, parks with rides have to ensure they are safe and rigorously maintained. Development roles ensure the future of the venue, developing new rides and attractions and keeping it looking fresh. Bigger parks might even have zoos or farms, so roles there include animal husbandry.


Tour guides A tour guide can vary from someone who takes visitors around a specific attraction to a person who leads a three-month trek through Asia. The main responsibilities are to ensure that a tour runs smoothly and people see what they’ve paid to see. Tour guides need to educate and inform visitors, as well as to set the tone for the itinerary.


Tour operators The distinction between the suppliers of holidays and agents is increasingly blurred, as more agents put together their own holidays by buying individual components such as hotel rooms or flights. However, in general, operators put together holidays that are packages, which are often fully financially protected in case a


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