search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FACILITY DESIGN & BIM


MAKING BIM WORKB Paul French, Commercial Market Manager at British Gypsum delves deeper into


what needs to be done to improve interaction with facility managers (FMs) on BIM projects and why correct data is crucial for the success of future projects.


Adoption and awareness of Building Information Modelling, or BIM, has grown rapidly over recent years with 95% of construction professionals aware of the process in 2015, compared to just 50% in 2010. However, to ensure BIM is truly successful and sustainable for years to come, a high level of supply chain collaboration and accurate data is required.


BIM provides construction professionals with access to a digital model of a building project as it evolves


38 | TOMORROW’S FM


to improve cost-efficiencies, enhance client outcomes and maximise the speed of a project’s delivery.


“BIM IS LIKELY TO


BECOME INCREASINGLY INTELLIGENT.”


For FMs, using BIM can make the management of a building much easier, as a range of detailed information is compiled at the start of a project, helping tighten operational efficiency throughout the entire lifecycle.


START WITH THE END


IN MIND For the model to be truly effective, FMs need to be involved at the beginning of the planning process to form a reliable basis for decisions. After all, they are the ones that will be in charge of maintaining the space, once occupied.


Engaging all parties early in the design process also allows for a greater focus on the building’s performance during occupancy, meaning increased savings on


twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72