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COVER STORY


NETWORK YOUR DRINKING WATER TO REDUCE CARBON FOOTPRINT


For many businesses, reducing carbon footprint is a big part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) plans. Vivreau explain how changing your water dispensing systems could improve your environmental credentials.


The smart business has figured out that being properly responsible can reap long term rewards and improve profitability. Water should be an important consideration in these plans, in particular the way that drinking water is made available, and that’s where Vivreau comes in.


Vivreau is a global leader and innovator in the development and manufacture of purified drinking water systems, specialising in the highest quality drinking water products and consistently excellent service. As pioneers of the Table Water Bottling System, Vivreau’s key products also include the Vi tap, LinkLine and reusable Designer glass bottles.


The LinkLine system from Vivreau is an inventive solution to traditional water flow in large buildings. The system requires a single chiller unit to offer filtered chilled still and sparkling or even boiling hot water, at multiple locations, on varying floors, across an entire building. LinkLine is a method of networking your water supply, just as you would a communication network. LinkLine will continuously re-circulate the water around the pipes to ensure that freshness is guaranteed.


LinkLine is environmentally superior as it eliminates the need for regular deliveries of pre-bottled water, thus lessening the impact on the environment through reduced transport pollution. When installed with Vivreau’s Table Water Bottling System, the disposal of large quantities of glass or plastic waste from pre- bottled water purchase is eradicated.


20 | TOMORROW’S FM


“THE VI TAP IS CAPABLE OF DELIVERING HIGH QUANTITIES OF CHILLED WATER.”


CASE STUDY Leading global research, educational


and professional publishers, Springer Nature, were looking for a space saving and environmentally- friendly water solution for their UK headquarters in London when they discovered Vivreau. Springer Nature has a large number of meeting rooms on campus holding up to 30 people at a time. John Haskell, Contracts Manager at Springer Nature agreed that part of Vivreau’s appeal was the environmentally-friendly aspect.


Springer Nature initially opted for Vivreau’s Table Water Bottling System, which dispenses unlimited quantities of filtered chilled still and sparkling water in-house. Reusable Designer glass bottles are used to serve water and can be branded with a company logo, as well as include an environmentally-friendly message; an excellent extension to existing branding, perfectly suited to any boardroom. (click here to see our Table Water Bottling System in action)


After the first installation, Springer Nature was so impressed that they proceeded to install four LinkLine systems across the campus, one Table Water Bottling System and 30 Vi tap systems.


Kevin Winchester, Head of Business Development at Vivreau commented: “We’ve been working with Springer Nature for a number of years. There were some space issues for their tea points and by using the LinkLine system they have effectively removed all the localised chillers throughout the whole complex. LinkLine is up


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