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DEMYSTIFYING COOLING Here, Richard Metcalfe, Sales Director, at temperature control


specialists ICS Cool Energy, discusses the varying ways heating and cooling engineers can get to grips with datacentre cooling,


and help keep their customers’ systems running in both a cost and energy-efficient way.


There’s no escaping the fact that datacentres form a critical part of business infrastructure for a wide variety of market sectors. Ensuring they remain operational no matter what, is a major challenge, and one that is quite different to those usually faced by temperature control contractors. Many facilities and IT managers fall into the trap of striving for continual performance and paying over and above what they need to for energy, so it is the contractor’s responsibility to ensure they have the most appropriate cooling system in place that won’t cost the earth.


Given the volume of electrical equipment often housed in datacentres and server rooms, combined with the heat they generate and the tendency for datacentres to be remotely located in the depths of a building in confined and secure spaces, the biggest performance-critical application that must be tackled is cooling.


However, delivering cooling that will provide the optimum working temperature required for datacentres – between 21-25°C – regardless of external seasonal temperature changes, can come at a huge cost to


20 | DATACENTRE MANAGEMENT


the end user if energy consumption is not closely monitored, given the volume of cooling needed.


GOING BACK TO BASICS First and foremost, it is important


take a step back from the installation and gauge a few key factors that will ultimately impact the cooling system used. First, where is the datacentre located – is it underground, and if so, how far? Next, how big is the available space – is it a new build project where dedicated space for a cooling system can be incorporated into the design stage, or will it be a retrofit


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