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bypass air. The panel is designed with a unique combination of directional and vertical perforations, which provides evenly distributed air flow across the entire face of a typical IT rack. They are also zoned so you can damper quarter sections of the grille that collate to empty quarter section within the racks.


Known as DirectPerf, they maximise energy efficiency and the overall capacity of any new or existing datacentre by nearly eliminating bypass air. The precise delivery of air to the face of the rack reduces by-pass air allowing new facilities, in turn, to reduce the number of computer room air handler (CRAH) units. Retrofits can set CRAH units with fixed speed fans to standby mode or adjust variable fan drives to operate at a lower static pressure, saving energy. Likewise, the 88% Capture Index eliminates the need for an aisle containment roof. We’ve starting calling this a ‘virtual’ cold aisle. The facility’s overall cooling capacity will also be improved allowing for the addition of IT equipment without the capital investments on infrastructure.


“Many datacentres are


producing nearly four times more cooled airflow than is needed.”


On this specific project the client was able to install approximately 150kW additional load in the centre of the room, which was previously ‘stranded’, taking the total load to around 900kW. Instead of installing additional cooling, more than 10 units were in fact decommissioned. The overall air balance improved, the hotspots were eliminated and the static pressure in the floor void increased significantly. Overall the project was a huge success and projected ROI is less than 20 months.


www.8solutions.com twitter.com/TomorrowsEM DATACENTRE MANAGEMENT | 19


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