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NEWS Senior Sales Appointment By Cromwell Polythene


Cromwell Polythene has made a significant addition to its senior management team with the appointment of Nathaniel Potts as Sales and Marketing Director. He joins the company from Commercial Group, one of the largest independently owned office supplies and FM providers, where he was Director of Corporate Accounts, focusing on the business development of major corporate customers and managing the sales team.


Commenting on his appointment, Cromwell’s Managing Director James Lee said: “I am excited at the thought of Nat joining the company and playing an active part in our continued growth.”


Having demonstrated his entrepreneurial flair in successful family businesses, Potts formed a company providing office supplies and Xerox copier systems, where he oversaw and won business with key accounts before its eventual sale 12 years later.


In 2010, he was headhunted by Office Depot, a global office supplies business employing some 40,000 people, with a turnover in excess


of £11.5billion. Here he held the position of International Business Development Director, responsible for securing and managing major multi- million pound accounts, including Unilever, Linde, Pilkington and Intercontinental Hotels.


Nat Potts’ appointment forms part of a wider restructuring of the Cromwell sales team, with Paul Fleetwood assuming the role of National Accounts Director. “The reorganisation plays to Cromwell’s considerable sales strengths, enabling Paul to focus on those major accounts that he has been instrumental in bringing in and building, while Nat’s appointment brings invaluable experience, skills and competencies to the business,” said James Lee.


“I am sure he will make an enormous contribution, not only driving and managing future sales growth, but also in effectively managing and developing the sales team, enabling them to achieve their own ambitions and Cromwell’s future success.”


www.cromwellpolythene.co.uk Gatwick Cleaner Punched In The Face On The Job


An OCS employee at Gatwick Airport has asked if he can be excused from one of his jobs, after getting punched in the face by a member of the public.


Jean-Noel Talate was cleaning the ladies toilets at the London airport when he inadvertently walked in on a woman who was using one of the cubicles. He then suffered verbal abuse and a punch in the face from the woman’s partner.


According to a report in the Surrey Mirror, Jean-Noel was cleaning the washrooms in the airport’s South Terminal when he knocked on an unlocked cubicle and, believing it to


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be empty, opened the door, only to find a woman in there.


He said: “I opened one door and there was a lady inside. I told her I was a cleaner and asked her to please remember to lock the cubicle. It was embarrassing for both of us. She started calling me a pervert and saying very bad words to me.


“I told her if she wanted to complain I would take her to the information point, but her partner was outside and he was not happy. He punched me in the face and cut the inside of my mouth.”


Jean-Noel added that he wanted OCS to reverse the newly introduced


requirement for male cleaners to go into the ladies toilets, saying: “It is a new rule that started just for our night shift cleaning team about a month ago. It hasn’t changed for the cleaners working during the day.”


A statement from Gatwick Airport said that posters indicating that cleaners of the opposite sex may be at work in the washrooms are on display, and that cleaners are instructed to place a cone outside the front door to the washrooms while they are cleaning. They added that if any visitors feel uncomfortable, the cleaners are advised to leave and return at a later point.


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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