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ASIG employees preparing to fuel aircraft. When the aircraft is ready for refu-


elling, the fuel is sent through under- ground pipes on the airport tarmac — almost like a water system — to a hydrant system which is placed at each gate. With the hydrant system in place, it makes the process more efficient than using tanker trucks. It can take some time to fill a big jet. As an example, a Boeing 767 direct flight out of Win- nipeg to London, England would take close to 50,000 litres of fuel. “About 70 per cent of our refuelling


is done through hydrant system, while the other 30 per cent is done by tank- ers.”


Communication is key Once an aircraft is parked at the


gate, ASIG employees immediately begin the refuelling process, which is more than just filling the aircraft’s tank. Before they begin, the fueler is dispatched and prints a ticket with the correct amount of fuel requested by the airline. After finding the correct aircraft on the tarmac (which is iden- tified by the tail number), and making the necessary preparations to begin fuelling, they once again communicate back to the office to double-check that everything is correct. When the fuel is all loaded onto the aircraft, the fueler and dispatch office communicate one more time to make sure everything was done correctly. “I can’t emphasize enough the im-


portance of communication in this line of work,” says Ilott. “It’s a safety issue to under-fuel, but also to over-


thehubwinnipeg.com


Tank farm.


fuel, so you have to get it right.” ASIG handled close to 25,000 flights last year,


distributing over


133-million litres of fuel. With those kinds of numbers, the employees at ASIG have to be well trained and pre- pared for anything that comes their way. “Our training program is very in- depth, and very hands -on because ev- eryone needs to be on the same page,” says Ilott. Upon getting hired, employees re-


ceive approximately three months of training, which is all done in-house, with one week in the classroom and the rest out in the field working with a trainer. Tere are approximately 25 employees total at ASIG, who work rotating shifts, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. “We fuel all day and all night,” says


Ilott. “It’s a never ending process.” So the next time you’re about to


board a flight at the Winnipeg Rich- ardson International Airport, you can have the peace of mind that every pre- caution necessary was taken for you to get to your destination safely.


Spring 2017 • 63


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