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Denver's population in 2016 was 682,545, making it the 23rd largest city in the U.S. Te seven county metro area has nearly 3.0 million people. 5. Denver's history is short, but colourful. In 1858,


Denver sports fans have a lot to cheer about with seven professional sports teams to choose from.


there was not a single person living in the Denver metro area except for some migrating camps of Arapaho and Cheyenne Native Americans. Just 30 years later, Colo- rado was a state with a population of almost 200,000. It was a Gold Rush that caused this boom and in a 30 to 40 year period Denver saw some of the wildest events in the "Wild West." Tis fascinating period is brought to life at museums, old gold mining towns and in hundreds of elegant Victorian buildings. LoDo, a 26 square block historic district, has the largest concentration of Victorian and turn-of-the-century buildings in the country. Today, LoDo is home to 90 brewpubs, rooftop cafes, restaurants, sports bars and nightclubs. Te History Colorado Center is a $120 million interactive museum where it is possible to descend into a coal mine, jump off a ski jump and visit other exciting moments from Denver and Colorado his- tory. 6. Denver loves its sports. Denver is one of only two


16th Street Mall. Flowers in bloom in front of the State Capital Building. 40 • Spring 2017


cities (Philadelphia is the other) to have seven professional sports teams: NFL Denver Broncos; NBA Denver Nug- gets; NHL Colorado Avalanche; MLB Colorado Rock- ies; MLS Colorado Rapids; MLL Colorado Outlaws; and NLL Colorado Mammoth. Te Colorado Rockies have 11 Major League Baseball attendance records, while the Denver Broncos have sold out every game for more than 20 years. Denver also hosts one of the world's largest rode- os – the National Western Stock Show & Rodeo. Denver was the only city to build three new sports stadiums in the 1990s: 50,000-seat Coors Field; 75,000-seat Sports Au- thority Field at Mile High and 20,000-seat Pepsi Center. 7. Denver brews more beer than any other city. Te first building in Denver was a saloon, so it's natural that Den- ver would become a great beer town. Coors Brewery is the world's largest. Te legendary Coors Brewery in Golden can brew up to 22 million barrels and package up to 16 million barrels annually, making it the biggest single-site brewer in the world. Take a tour highlighting the malting, brewing and packaging processes, ending with a sampling of Coors fine products and shopping in the gift shop! Denver's Great American Beer Festival is the largest in the nation, offering more than 6,700 different beers for tast- ing. Te Wynkoop Brewing Company is one of the largest brewpubs in the country. On an average day in the Denver Metro area, more than 200 different beers are brewed and can be enjoyed in 100 breweries, brew pubs and tap rooms. 8. Denver - Te Mile High City, really is exactly one mile high. By an amazing stroke of good luck, the 13th step on the west side of the State Capitol Building is ex- actly 5,280 feet above sea level — one mile high. In Den- ver's rarified air, golf balls go 10 percent farther. So do cocktails. Alcoholic drinks pack more of a punch than at sea level. Te sun feels warmer, because you are closer to it and there is 25 percent less protection from the sun. Te Mile High City is also extremely dry, so it is a good idea to drink more water than usual. With less water vapor in the air at this altitude, the sky really is bluer in Colorado.


The Hub


Photo by Stan Obert.


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