search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Sanikiluaq Sanikiluaq


A hidden gem in Hudson Bay By Bill Burfoot


Looking down on the town Sanikiluaq from the air, the only settlement on the Belcher archipelago which lies off the coast of Quebec in Hudson Bay.


I


f you’re looking to experience some of the most beau- tiful coastlines and island landscapes in the world - combined with some unique, amazing wildlife and natural beauty that you are ever going to see — you’re


going to want to book a flight to Sanikiluaq, Nunavut. Te picturesque town of just over 800 is Nunavut's southernmost community, located in the Belcher Islands of southeastern Hudson Bay about 150 kilometres off the coast of Quebec. Te Belcher archipelago is a group of about 1,500 islands located in Hudson Bay north of the entrance to James Bay and are spread out over almost 3,000 square kilometres. Te hamlet was established in 1974, but the Inuit have lived on these islands in Hudson Bay for centuries. Sanikiluaq is on one of the largest islands within the Belcher archipelago — Flaherty Island. Te island is named after a legendary Inuk person named Sandy Kiluaq. Kiluaq was ad- opted as a little boy who lived in hard times, but he grew up to become the best hunter and best provider in the region — a hero to his community, so they named it after him. Te islands first came to the attention of outsiders af-


32 • Spring 2017 Sanikiluaq airport terminal. How to get there


Flight duration 3 hrs.


Calm Air flies three times a week in summer


ter Henry Hudson spotted them in 1610. Yet, it was not until 1840 that an employee of the Hudson's Bay Com- pany, Tomas Wiegand, led an expedition to the island from Fort George. More recently, in 1915, filmmaker and anthropologist Robert Flaherty became the first qallunaat (out- sider) to spend a winter there. Flaherty later went on to produce the famous film, “Nanook of the North” and mapped the islands on his 1914 and 1916 expeditions. Te hamlet was part of the Northwest Territories until 1999, but after years of land claim negotiations and a formal political ac- cord in 1992, the territories were divided in or- der to create the new territory of Nunavut. Sanikiluaq


is now part of the region of Qikiqtaaluk within this new territory.


The Hub


Photo by Mike Beauregard. Photo by Judy Saxby.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80