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A scene from the gorgeous International Peace Garden that lies on the Canada-United States border just south of Boissevain. It is the only garden in the world to straddle an international boundary.


roses smother the roadsides. Carmen, Winkler, Morden and the small towns in between harbour lovely gardens. Te grounds of the Morden Research Station were once filled with yellow roses, blood red peonies and rusty chry- santhemums, all developed there. Today, the rows of fruit trees are gone but remain a memory along with the po- tentilla, lilacs and clematis varieties that were tested or developed there for hardiness on the prairies. Tall-spired churches and neat-as-a-pin towns grace the farmlands and reflect the heritage of the French and Mennonites who have carved their psyches deep on the land. Teir gardens and their architecture tell an eloquent story of these sturdy settlers. Te southwest part of Manitoba is a continuation of the


Pembina Valley garden landscape, with pretty little towns such as Souris, where the swinging bridge ends beside a lovely private garden, just one of many in this garden town. Nor far away at the International Peace Garden,


150,000 flowers bloom in the name of peace. Pelican Lake at Ninette is a favourite Manitoba playground and childhood home of Manitoba’s own jazz singer and au- thor, Martha Brooks. Te area is the inspiration for much of what she writes. Te golden dunes of Spirit Sands, 16 miles from Car-


berry, occupy the largest sand area in Canada. Te once 6,500-square-kilometre desert was left behind when the glaciers moved north, and Lake Agassiz dried up. It is gradually being shrunk by encroaching prairie grasses and aspens. Tis unique and beautiful area, although now only four square kilometres of open sand, supports its own unique garden of ancient juniper, tumbleweed and cacti. Lovely Brandon, once called the Wonder City of the


Northwest, is snuggled in a valley of the Blue Hills, its stately homes and university sheltered by giant elms. It is the gateway to the aptly named Parkland region and towns such as Roblin, Russell and Dauphin. Stop in


Life on the Red with the Museum for Human Rights in the background.


thehubwinnipeg.com


Tall prairie grasses waving in the wind. Spring 2017 • 27


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