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differences between different cultures,” he said. “We have 15th- century to 19th-century themes, from rustic to sumptuous.” The winery also has two dining options — Gabriel Archer Tavern, located adjacent to Wessex Hall, and Café Provencal in Wedmore Place. He compares the development of the winery to the passage


of a person from infancy to adulthood. In the beginning there is birth and growth, in the middle there is progress and enrichment, and finally there is maturity and esteem. The winery has received more than 250 industry awards. It has won seven annual awards from Decanter Magazine. The winery’s Acte 12 Chardonnay was rated “One of the Best Wines in the World” in the magazine’s world wine awards in 2007 and 2008. Robert Parker, a leading U.S. wine critic with an international influence, named the Williamsburg Winery an “excellent producer,” and since 2014, five of its wines have garnered 90+ point ratings. Its 2010 Adagio won the prestigious Virginia Governor’s Cup in the 2014 competition. Well into its third decade of operations, the company has


“passed the test of becoming an adult,” Duffeler said. He recounts a memory of meeting Marchese Antinori of the 600-year-old Italian wine company, the tenth-oldest family owned company in the world. Duffeler spoke to him about the challenges facing the winery and Antinori noted, “The next 100 years will be a lot easier.” Looking forward to 2025 and beyond, Duffeler envisions


the winery in its maturity — quality over quantity, strong assets, stable and steady growth, and the development of the


winery into a culinary destination. “What is success?” he muses. “Success is anybody who is passionate about his work and does things to the best of his abilities,” he said. “Success comes one day at a time and good people are important. We have assembled an evolutionary team, a team that has belief.” Duffeler’s son Patrick Duffeler II, who has been involved


with the winery since the beginning, serves as president and CEO. Matthew Meyer is vice president and winemaker, Kristen Duffeler is vice president and in-house counsel, Simon Smith is vice president of food and beverage, and Michael Kimball is assistant vice president of marketing. Terrence Duffeler maintains close ties with his family and the winery and works as an executive director at JPMorgan Chase & Co. “The Williamsburg Winery, while taking great pride in


the significance of the place it occupies in the wine-making history of Virginia, will never stop looking towards the future,” Duffeler wrote in his 2002 book, The Art & Science of Viticulture and Winemaking at the Williamsburg Winery. “The architects of the winery’s success are its people and their love of wine, of Virginia, and of the hospitality for which our state is famous,” he wrote. “Enjoy life,” is the frequent parting advice he gives when


signing off on his letters, emails and blog posts. But the saying most often heard at the Williamsburg Winery is, “The best is yet to come.”


Wine rejoices the heart of man, and joy is the mother of all virtue. — Johann Wolfgang von Goethe H


74


March/April 2017


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