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each organization’s mission, all need help with operating the business. Giving time is obviously important for the groups, but volunteers also benefit from the interaction with a new circle of friends. Libraries: Ask the local librarian


where help is needed. It may be at the counter or answering computer questions. Children’s programs often use an extra person, possibly with reading or tutoring assistance. The library is also the likely place to find a book club. Museums: Volunteers are always


needed for the many jobs that help maintain each organization’s historic focus and its connection to today’s residents and visitors alike. Food Bank: Local food pantries


may need assistance with distribution and/or meal preparation. Check with the Northern Neck Food Bank for information on other ways to help. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary: Those


interested in boating can join the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, which helps the U.S. Coast Guard promote boating safety. It’s not necessary to own a boat or to be an experienced boater—the auxiliary provides training. Audubon Society: Join an Audubon


chapter and take part in bird counts, maintain nature trails, build bird houses, and generally raise awareness of issues affecting birds and other wildlife. Animal shelters: Humane society,


animal shelter, animal rescue, animal rehab—whatever the title, these groups need help with the feeding, cleaning, walking, and socializing of the animals in their care. Habitat for Humanity: Be part of a


construction team assembled by this well- known organization to build a habitat house. Besides helping a person achieve home ownership, volunteers learn valuable skills that can prove useful on their own future projects. And many more: Volunteers should


look for a groups whose work matches their interests, initially planning a small number of hours to see if it’s a good fit.


SMILE


People often say they’re busier in retirement than they were when working full time. It may seem that way simply because they now choose the work in order to enjoy the activity. Whatever the reason, it appears that busyness does indeed translate to happiness. H


66 March/April 2017


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