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appeared in full wedding attire and fed their guests until they were satisfied enough to leave. The shoes were tra- ditionally handed to the groom by the father of the bride, symbolizing her in- ability to run without her shoes. As a final wish or hope to the bride and


groom, guests traditionally throw rice, birdseed or dried lavender. Originally the guests would throw oats, wheat, corn or a grain of some kind. Tossing these at the bride and groom was meant to shower the newlyweds with prosperity, fertility and good fortune. Learning that many of our wedding tra- ditions are rooted in a diversity of beliefs allows us to choose what we do and do not want to incorporate into our wed- ding day. However, knowing that we may not agree with the roots of some tradi- tions, why would we still practice them? Perhaps the answer lies in the simple traditional poem that many couples still practice today.


Something old, something new, Something borrowed, something blue. Something old reminds us of where we have been. It ties us to the history that has made us who we are. Although the origi-


nal substance might be lost or irrelevant to what we believe today, the truth of what they were meant to be is still interwoven into the very fabric of who we are and should not be forgotten. Something new is what we become when we tie ourselves to another person and find hope in who we will become together as we begin a life with them. Something borrowed reminds us that we cannot walk this life alone and that we can always depend on those


who love us. Something blue is a hope for prosperity and the hope of passing down our traditions, both the old and the new, to future generations.


So, as you plan your perfect day or as you help to plan the perfect day for another, take time to understand the tra- ditions that you incorporate in the special day. You may even find a new tradition that will make your wedding day an event that your guests remember forever. H


The House & Home Magazine


41


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