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more thought of as property and fathers had the option of giving their daughter away, often for a price. This is where we get the tradition of giving away the bride. Many of the traditions of today were founded in the fear of the unknown. To- day we plan weddings where bridesmaids and groomsmen dress alike, but originally the uniformity was done as an attempt to confuse evil spirits or jealous suitors that may try to stop the wedding. Even the veil that has come to represent innocence was originally used to conceal the identity of the bride so that evil spirits would not have the opportunity to ruin the union. Ringing the bells on a wedding day stems from an Irish traditional belief that the sound of the bells would ward off evil spirits, so even the bride would hide small bells in her bouquet, just in case. They also symbolized a harmonious life for the couple, and therefore all evil spirits were warned to stay away with the ringing of the bells.


The white bridal gown was made widely popular in the Victorian Era when Queen Victoria wore an embroidered white silk- satin gown. Her choice to wear white was very controversial in her day. The bold


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March/April 2017


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