search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
“Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.” Matthew 25


Confederate the


t was a lazy summer day on the shores of the Bull Run River in July of 1861. The birds were singing, and the fish were jumping. It seemed all was well with the world. Then suddenly, this tranquil scene was shattered by the sounds of advancing Union troops numbering 37,000. They had marched from Washington, D.C. intending to strike the Confederate forces numbering 32,000. The Confederates fought a defensive battle for most of the day then rallied and broke through the Union left flank. Panicked, the Union forces retreated toward Washington. First Bull Run, also known as First Manassas, was a confidence building victory for the Confederacy and a


I


shocking defeat for the North. After the triumph came the grim reality of the conse- quences of war. Between 1,700 and 2,000 Confeder- ate men were wounded or killed. The wounded came pouring into Richmond, Virginia. Soon the hospitals and the private homes that had thrown open their doors to care for the wounded were overflowing with wounded. Many soldiers were swaddled in blood stained bandages and smelling of gangrene. At first, white women were discouraged from car- ing for the wounded and dying. It was believed that women just were not suited to deal with the bloody gore of war. The battle wounds included amputa- tions, head wounds, and stomach wounds. Carnage was caused by cannon fire and canister shot. Amid all the suffering, there emerged a woman named Sally Louisa Tompkins. She was born sometime between November 9-11 in 1833 at Poplar Grove in Mathews County, Virginia. Her grandfather, Colonel John Paterson, received his commission from General George Washington at the Battle of


20 angel By Bob Cerullo


Captain Sally Tompkins Courtesy of the Mathews County Historical Society


March/April 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100