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Advertising Feature


Health and


Safety


Signage Saves Lives


According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) there were 144 UK workers killed at work between 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016. Managing Director of Stocksigns Group Danny Adamson responds to the shocking statistics and explains how having the correct signage in place can lead to greater prevention of accidents in the workplace. Stocksigns|https://www.stocksigns.co.uk/]


is one of Britain’s leading sign makers and digital printers with over 60 years of expertise. In November 2016, the HSE released its


annual statistics report* with information about workplace-related injuries and illnesses. The HSE UK statistics also showed that there were 1.3 million people suffering from a work-related illness, over 621,000 work-related injuries and 2,515 people died from mesothelioma due to past asbestos exposure. Danny Adamson explains, “Accidents are


unpredictable, however there is a lot that can be done to prevent accidents happening in the first place. One of the key ways of keeping people safe in any environment is using the correct signage. “In the past 20 years, there has been a


downward trend in the rate of fatal work- related injuries. In 1992 the safety signs directive was adopted by all European Union member states. In 1996 the changes


were implemented through the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals Regulations) act. This required employers to provide specific safety signs whenever there is a risk that has not been avoided or controlled by other means. “The introduction of Safety Signs and


Signals Regulations protects workers and members of the public. Since then the rate of fatal injury has reduced by over 50%. In 1996 there were 0.9 fatal injuries per every 100,000 workers, today the figure is 0.4. “There is a correlation between the


introduction of safety signage and a reduction in the number of accidents. The first step of ensuring safety to everyone is being able to alert them to danger and having compliant signage in place. Today there is a huge range of signs available for all types of hazards. Signage is a small investment, but it will encourage safer working environments.” RoSPA’s campaign manager Rebecca Hickman said, “Our work over the past 100 years has taught us that accidents do not have to happen, and that’s why we’re stepping up our activities to help keep people safe. Our mission is to save lives and reduce injuries and our vision is to lead the way on accident prevention. RoSPA plays a unique role in UK health and safety. As a member organisation that campaigns for safety change we also provide services


and support to help organisations on their own journey to become safer and healthier places in which to work.” Stocksigns has a range of signs available


for all situations and provide an expert service to give customers the best advice and guidance. All of their signs are HSSA (Health and Safety Sign Association) assured and are fully compliant with ISO 7010, the UK standard for safety signs. It is essential for businesses to have up-to-date signage. Enforced by the HSE, if non-compliant signage is being used it could lead to extensive fines or serious consequences including prison sentences, personal injuries or even loss of life. The signmakers are currently celebrating


eight years of partnership with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) and are donating 20p from every sign sold to the Brighter Beginnings appeal. The Brighter Beginnings campaign is part of RoSPA’s centenary celebrations. The funds raised will help provide new parents with information packs to give their little ones a safer start in life. *Figures are based on estimates of self-


reported workplace injury and work- related illness, sourced from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). The LFS is a national survey run by the Office for National Statistics. Figures quoted relate to the year 2015/16,


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