This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The English Patient


Red Cross Hospital, Early Bank


Early Bank, Mottram Road, Stalybridge


Another woman, 82-year-old Mrs Martha Smith, who lived at Swan Houses opposite Bower Fold, spent a total of 468 hours, first at Early Bank, then the Old Hall Hospital, Mottram, darning thousands of pairs of socks for the injured soldiers, this would be documented by the Red Cross.


On the 21st May 1919, at 1.30pm, an auction took place at the Old Hall, which included 20 bedsteads, 18 hardwood chairs, sheets, pillars, socks, shirts, towels, and a billiard table were just some of the items.


The Saddleworth Red Cross Hospital at Ashway Gap, Greenfield, closed on the 17th February 1919, as did another chapter in our local history, but one of great importance and dedication, by all those involved. As we remember over 100 years ago, the great sacrifice given by our ‘Brothers-in-arms’.


Early Bank house, Stalybridge, continued as a residence and for many years, was the home of the Lady of the Manor, (Lancashire side, Stamford Estates) Mrs. C. Grey , who on her removal to Malton, Yorkshire in November 1953, offered the property to the town council of Stalybridge, who declined it. It was then quickly bought by a private developer, who demolished the house in the summer of 1954, and built houses on the site, and in the gardens. Today only the original outbuildings and lodge remain, as well the houses. Ashway Gap at Greenfield suffered the same fete, and was demolished in 1981, thankfully Mottram Old Hall remains to this day, as a much loved private residence.


Mark Sheppard & Joyce Raven of Peak Dale Historical Research offer services, including historical research on anything from cottages, farms, inns, etc. For more information on how they can help you please email them on: peakdaleresearch@yahoo.co.uk


Ashway Gap, Greenfield


Ryecroft Hall, Audenshaw


www.aroundsaddleworth.co.uk


around SADDLEWORTH 19


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