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The long galley-shaped space has been broken here and there with the addition of curved walls


Style, Bobo, Urban, Artist’s Studio, Skyline and Penthouse. Te interiors are credited to Didier Gomez, who has created exceptionally spacious and light-filled rooms that are a stand-out feature of the hotel. A combination of mirrored walls and inner window-walls that separate the bathroom and bedroom spaces provide ample natural light and create an impression of space. Tis is cleverly conceived. For modesty, the bathrooms have venetian blinds on the inside to draw down when required and the bathroom door slides across instead of opening out as another space saving measure. When drawn across to close the bathroom off, a wardrobe is revealed on the outside, complete with hotel amenities, mini bar and safe and ample storage and hanging space for guests planning to stay for a week or more. Te mirrored walls, behind the bed, are framed identically to the windows in the bathroom. It gives the appearance of a bedroom with windows on three sides. An illusion of luxury in a standard size city centre hotel bedroom. Tere’s much to recommend this hotel, not


and lobby. Light enters the far end space of the property from a courtyard space that has been developed into a charming outside decked bar/ eating area. the facing walls are clad with slate inset with high “living wall” features. When lit at night this bar is a delight and is proving a popular night spot for after work drinkers and late night revellers. In the basement is a spa, operated by French


heritage brand, Sothys, and a large events space incorporating meeting rooms. Te spa, which can be reached by guests via a separate


lift avoiding the lobby, features a central jacuzzi, a sauna, a hammam, a relaxation area and four treatment rooms. Mosaic tiles in black and white adorn walls and floors in the wet rooms of the spa although the walls in the treatment rooms, with their unique ‘Quartz sand wrap’ beds, are coloured deep orange. It is a visually striking interior, open by appointment only to guests and to non-residents. French architect, Eric Haour, is responsible


for the hotel’s 121 rooms, which are spread over nine floors, with six room categories; Paris


least the quality feature artwork. Its location is central and only a few Metro stops - or a short cab ride - from Gare du Nord, linking it to London’s St Pancras station in under three hours. Te popular outside bar, as well as the restaurant and the spa are open to non- residents and this gives the hotel a buzz. And the bedrooms, even the smallest, tick every box in terms of facility, style and comfort. Of course there are hundreds of reasons why you might wish to go out in Paris by night, but this hotel provides several good reasons not to. Le Renaisance Paris Republique, 40 Rue René Boulanger, Paris, France. Tel: +33 (01) 71 18 20 95 www.marriott.com/parpr


GS Magazine 29


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