This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Great blue lobelia.


Jack-in-the-pulpit.


in limestone quarries or where a thin layer of soil covers the Canadian Shield. Admirers of this plant have little desire to remove it from its wild habitat. The plant originated in Africa and in days of old was used to treat fevers and, as the name implies, the venomous bite of the viper snake. The yellow blooms of the common


buttercup (Ranunculus acris) bring back childhood memories to anyone who had one placed under their chin “to see if they were made of butter”. This delicate wildflower has made its way to Ontario from its native Europe. One of the few orange flowers found


in the wilds of Ontario, the native butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is a showstopper that attracts monarch butterflies. Gardeners will find this beauty almost impossible to move as


Congratulations Canada-150 years young!


it has a taproot that can extend 10 feet (three metres) into the ground! The teasel (Dipsacus) and the bull


thistle (Cirsium vulgare) are probably two of the most unwelcome European invaders. The biennial bull thistle is one of over 60 species of thistle that have taken over pasture land in central and northern Ontario. Although sometimes collected for dried flower arrangements, prickly teasels


are a


curse in the fields of southern Ontario. Late summer and early fall signals


the return of the native cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) and showy great blue lobelia (L. siphilitica). Both attract hummingbirds. Both were once believed to cure syphilis. Blooming at the same time, and


covering vast tracts of Ontario wetlands, the alien purple loose-


Teasel.


strife (Lythrum salicaria) has caused strife among naturalists. Eradication programs have been launched by those believing the plant is detrimental to the survival of many native species. Last but not least come the flowers


of autumn, and in the words of Catha- rine Parr Traill. . . “Silently but surely the summer


with all its wealth of flower has left us, though we still have a few of its latest blossoms lingering on into the ripened glory of the autumn days. Our roadsides and waste places are brilliant with the gay waving gold- enrod (Solidago canadensis) — that sun-loving flower which does not fade and droop its golden spikes under the August and September heat. Graceful asters, too, of many sorts are bloom- ing in sunshine and in shade.” x


Get social with Ontario Gardener


SAVING THE SEEDS OF OUR PAST


A leader in heirloom seeds, you can count on us for: • A high germination rate


• Generous seed quantities per packet • Only untreated seeds • Large selection


www.florabundaseeds.com Free Catalogue


Cottage Garden • Wildflowers • Heirloom Flowers, Vegetables & Herbs Keene, ON Canada


P:705-295-6440 F:705-295-4035 78 • Fall 2016 localgardener.net www.localgardener.net


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80