This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Yellow lady’s slipper.


Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum biflorum) flowers, which drip delicately from under the stem. In early to mid-summer, flowers


that prefer sunnier locations begin to bloom. Mother Nature’s talent for blending colours is evident in mass plantings that spill across open fields and meadows and line rural roadways. Typically the blossoms of these flowers are borne on tall stems that blend with native grasses.


Classifieds


BOB’S SUPERSTRONG GREEN- HOUSE


PLASTICS. Pond liners,


tarps. Resists Canadian thunderstorms, yellowing, cats, branches, punctures. Custom sizes. Samples. Box 1450-O-G, Altona, MB, R0G 0B0. Ph: 204-327-5540 Fax:


northerngreenhouse.com.


FRUIT TREES. Interesting selection of heritage and disease resistant apple, pear, Asian pear, plum, cherry and quince trees. Request a free catalogue today. Call 519-804-6060 or visit www.silver- creeknursery.ca


Select Plus Lilac Nursery


Mail order plants. Huge selection of lilacs and rare plants. 15% discount using this ad. Check us out at www. selectpluslilacs.com. Contact 450-477- 3797


GARDEN TOURS that exceed your expectations!


March: Philadelphia Flower Show April: Gardens of Victoria


May: Philly & the Dupont Gardens June: WAFA Barbados July: Gardens of Quebec August: Chicago/Wisconsin


Led by Margaret Dailey-Plouffe www.hnatravels.com 1-877-672-3030


localgardener.net NATURE & GARDENS ONTARIO’S ONLY 56KM


OUTDOOR ADVENTURE MUSEUM VISIT US AT SCHOOLOFHORTICULTURE.COM


ATTRACTIONS CULINARY HERITAGE GOLF SHOPS (204)-327-5527. www.


Chicory. The pink umbrella-like blooms of the


native Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium macu- latum) and the white caps of the import- ed Queen Anne’s lace (Daucus carota) are often found together. According to their origins, the two are unlikely part- ners. Joe Pye was a 17th century Native American who used the powers of the plant to cure fevers, while the flowers of the Queen Anne’s lace were presented to the ladies of English courtiers. The blue blossoms of chicory (Cicho-


Joe-Pye weed and Queen Anne’s lace.


rium intybus) would have been found in pioneer gardens, grown as a vegetable — its leaves in a salad, its roots boiled. Today the plant thrives on the gravely shoulders of Ontario roads, even push- ing its way through concrete cracks in urban areas. Its roots are now culti- vated, roasted and ground as a coffee substitute. Another blue beauty is Viper’s


Bugloss (Echium vulgare). It too thrives in gravelly environments, often found


Get social with Ontario Gardener at www.localgardener.net Fall 2016 • 77


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80