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‘Lambert Closse’ a traditional hybrid tea rose.


Explorer roses


By Ken Beattie 68 • Fall 2016 L


ike their namesakes, the Canadian Explorer roses are a hardy, vigorous lot. Bred not only to survive but also thrive in our northern gardens, these roses


add structure, colour and softness to gardens, not to mention romance and low maintenance. They may look like prima donnas; but they act like workhorses. From one parent, Rosa rugosa, the Explorers received


their hardiness and health. The other parent, R. kordesii, provided tetraploid (double normal chromosomes) vigour. Dr. Felicitas Svedja, who headed the program until the mid-nineties, allowed some hanky panky and so various seedlings arose to contribute their own traits. The Explorer Series was developed over three decades.


‘William Booth’, released in 1999, was the last rose in this series. The simple beauty of this single red rose with a


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