This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Presentation of the


first Dunington-Grubb Award to William Schreiber (left) from


OLCA Awards Chair- man Willy Huber in January, 1972.


1972 OLCA Board of Directors.


tractor and other equipment led the way to more modern methods. In plant material, pine and spruce


were the principal evergreens propa- gated by nurseries. Deciduous trees consisted mainly of the American elm, some sugar maple, an abundance of soft maple (because they were fast growing) and Lombardy and Carolina poplar since they too were fast grow- ing…most flower plantings consisted of geraniums and salvia. Perenni- als, heretofore practically unknown, were introduced into this


country


early in the century, and became quite popular. Lorrie Dunington-Grubb pioneered the development of many of Ontario’s large perennial borders during the late 1920s and 1930s, planning and personally planting the gardens herself. Mrs. Grubb, the former Lorrie


Dunington, was a landscape archi- tect in England. She met her future husband, Howard Grubb, a York- shireman and fellow landscape archi- tect, as she was presenting a lecture on town planning in 1911. They married…and immigrated to Canada in 1912. Together they opened an office in Toronto. Lorrie Dunington- Grubb lectured and wrote exten-


localgardener.net


1972 OGMLA Board of Directors.


sively on landscape and horticulture. Howard Burlingham Dunington- Grubb (1881-1961) left his mark on the landscape field with such projects as the Oakes Garden Theatre and Rainbow Bridge Gardens in Niag- ara Falls, Gage Park and McMaster University Entrance Park in Hamil- ton, and University Avenue in Toron- to. In 1958 he established a founda- tion for the development of Mead- owvale Botanical Gardens, northwest of Toronto, and …founded a nursery – Sheridan. Leslie Hancock (1892-1977) was


one of the most influential figures in the early days of landscape contract- ing in Ontario…He was determined to continue his education, and eventu- ally graduated in 1922 (from Ontario Agricultural College). A teaching appointment took him to China, where he met and married Dorothy Macklin, daughter of a Canadian medical missionary. Their son Donald recalls his father saying in later years that while in China he learned more than he went there to teach… In 1927, the family returned to


Canada. Though the Great Depres- sion had not yet begun, times were getting tougher, and no new additions


were being made to college teach- ing staffs. Landscape and construc- tion and contracting, however, was a new and growing business, and Leslie Hancock was able to find work in that field, first with Sheridan Nurseries and then with Brookdale Nurseries in Bowmanville. In the 1930’s he estab- lished a small nursery…Woodland Nurseries, which also became a kind of summer school for student of OAC. Hired as seasonal workers, they were taught not only landscape design and construction, but also the Latin genus and species, how the plants grew, whether they liked sun and shade, and so on. According to Glenn Peister, (McLean-Piester Limited, Kitchener) who worked there along with Dan McLean (Also of McLean-Piester), Bill Schrieber and John Northwood (both of Lakeshore Landscape Asso- ciates, Cooksville) and others, to his knowledge this was the only nursery that gave students that kind of oppor- tunity to learn. It wasn’t until after the Second


World War that the landscaping indus- try really came into its own, fuelled by the building boom of the late 1940s and 1950s. University graduates with degrees in horticulture were joined


Fall 2016 • 43


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