This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A brief historical


perspective of urban forests in Canada


By Michael Rosen, R.P.F.


The limbs of a full grown bur oak tree spread widely. I


n recent years, a greater amount of interest has been in expressed in urban forests — partly as a result of increasing urbanization but also due to new threats


including the invasive insect, emerald ash borer. Urban forests in Canada have been dominated by three themes: superficial support by the provincial and federal govern- ments, individuals’ commitment to developing urban forests of excellence, and awareness and action fueled by natural disaster. Canada – Urban people in a forest nation


The world looks to Canada as a forest leader – and with


good reason. With 417.6 million hectares of forest (10 per cent of the world) Canada leads in many of the standard, industrial forestry measures: “timber-productive forest land”, “allowable annual cut”, “area burned by forest fire”


38 • Fall 2016


and “area of certified forest”. How disconcerting it can be to learn that well over 80


per cent of Canadians live in cities and towns — their connection to the forest coming not from national parks or “wilderness” but from their neighbourhood park, road- side trees and backyards. Within the forestry profession, “urban forests” are still regarded as a “specialty field”, possi- bly because of the depressing implication that trees are less seen as a “resource” and more as an entity to preserve and protect for solely environmental/social purposes. Canadians’ identification with trees can be found every-


where. The maple leaf adorns Canada’s flag and shield. Many communities’ names proudly commemorate an arboreal connection: “Oakville”, “Pointe-au-Chêne” and “Cedar”. Canadian urban forest advocacy groups: “Trees


localgardener.net


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80