This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The Rose Garden. By 1990, the school campus was declared the Niagara


Parks Botanical Gardens and School of Horticulture. After 80 years of developing the plant collections to include over 3000 different varieties, the gardens have are now one of the most diverse in Canada. As the gardens have been designed as a teaching tool, many of the plants have been labelled and inventoried. The gardens today


The years have seen tremendous development of feature


An aerial view of the Botanical Gardens (lower left) with Whirlpool Point on the Niagara River, just downstream of the Niagara Falls.


gardens. The Botanic Gardens now contain several special- ty gardens which include gardens dedicated to ornamental grasses, vegetables, woodland, shade, herbs, perennials, rhododendron and azaleas, seasonal display beds and a rock garden among others. Of special note is the old specimen area which contains


trees planted in the 1930s and 1940s, which include cucumber magnolia (Magnolia acuminate), Dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) and Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). A 150 to 200-year-old bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) is one of the remaining from the original oak savannah. A herbarium containing approximately 13,000 dried


An aerial view of the garden grounds. 34 • Fall 2016


plant specimens date back to 1894. Some were collected by the first chief gardener for the parks commission, Roder- ick Cameron while others are from students that attended the school’s first year of programming. This collection is of tremendous historical value and a resource for local resto- ration projects.


localgardener.net


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