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The cherry collection.


Katie Osborne Lilac Garden.


all campaigned to protect the marsh from development. In 1927 much of the south shore was purchased by the board of park management with three things in mind: protect the wetland itself, site the new university on 50 acres along its shore, and use the remaining 300 acres or so as the site for the new botanical garden. The third initiative was the creation of


RBG Magnolia Collection.


a beautiful park-like entrance to the city of Hamilton along the major highway to Toronto. Termed the North Western Entrance Competition, it included both the beautification of 55 acres on the Burling- ton Heights and the construction of a new “high level” road bridge spanning an 1851 canal. Launched in late 1927 as a competi- tion for architects, it resulted in the conver- sion of a 5.5 acre gravel pit into the Rock Garden, extensive parklands and gardens covering the rest of the heights, and the construction of a beautiful bridge spanning the canal. The five years between 1927 and 1932


must have been heady. The momentum to build parks and protect nature continued with the gift of the Valley Farm in Alder- shot, east of the Burlington Heights, by the Hendrie family to the park board on the condition it be a public park in perpetu- ity. They saw the establishment of the new university and the construction of major gardens and parks. Hamilton hosted the first British Empire


Princess Point Archaeology pottery shards measurement. 12 • Fall 2016


Games in 1930, the event that would later be called the Commonwealth Games. In May of 1930 King George V granted permission to the Park Board to call their project Royal Botanical Gardens. And after preliminary research, a special commission was struck in 1932 to work on develop-


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