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PRINTMAKING & CONTEMPORARY PRACTICE BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS) IN FINE ART


Add-on option


What is the programme about?


The emphasis of this programme is on engaging and obtaining a sound technical knowledge of the many traditional printmaking skills, the critical and creative ability to translate and develop their own personal visual language, which in turn allows students to organise that experience in the production of a body of work that underlines the critical concepts such as reproduction, multiplicity, originality vs. copy, etc.


Students will use traditional print processes but also are encouraged to experience contemporary print practices and methodologies, which inevitably include photo-lens based media and digital technologies and animation. The development of drawing and other image making techniques, in tandem with the advancement of knowledge and understanding of historic, critical and contextual developments within contemporary art practice is central to the print curriculum utilised in the department.


Modules


Year 2: Printmaking processes, etching, woodcutting, stone lithography, silkscreen, collography, photography, drawing, research, twentieth century fine art history, methodologies of art history, professional practice, digital image formats, studio management.


Year 3: Exploring sources, negotiated studio themes, print processes, photo etching, colour separation, photo silkscreen, 3d & alternative print processes, plate lithography & carborundum, photography, medium & large format, alternative photo methods critical & contextual studies, professional practice, European Erasmus exchange (optional), field trips/ gallery visits, moving image, production, video production, photography.


Year 4: Self-directed themes, printmaking studio practice, critical & contextual studies, self-initiated CCS project, professional practice, photography (optional), video (optional), animation techniques (optional), digital communication processes, fabrication processes, installation & presentation methods, engaging with an audience, degree show production and display.


What can I do after the programme?


Graduates of the programme have advanced in both innovative and creative directions to contribute to the more general visual culture industry in Limerick and further afield. The programme has been providing the education, physical and intellectual environment that allows for students to develop their creative ability in a variety of ways to nurture their artistic processes and prepare them for life in particular creative industries.


Graduates of the programme have gone on to work as independent artists, art teachers, researchers and academics, cultural entrepreneurs, curators, art administrators and graphic artists.


Specialisation following LC110 First Year Art & Design


Programme Code Add-on option


Programme Level Level 8


Duration 3 Years


Class Contact Year 1: 23 hours per week. Course is increasingly self-directed as it progresses.


Entry Requirements: Entry into Printmaking & Contemporary Practice is by competition and selection during LC110 First Year Art & Design.


Location


Clare St Campus, Limerick


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


Contact Mr. Des MacMahon & Ms. Noelle Noonan, Programme Leaders


Tel: 061 293396 Email: des.mcmahon@lit.ie noelle.noonan@lit.ie


View our dedicated programme page and galleries at www.lit.ie/Courses/Print


> 40 Undergraduate Prospectus 2017/2018


Limerick School of Art & Design


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