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THE HERALD FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 02 2016


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Post Office ‘consultation’ - ONCE again this week, the


issue of moving Aberystwyth’s Crown Post Office from its bespoke home on Great Darkgate Street to be incorporated into WHSmith’s shop on Terrace Road dominated community politics in the town. Last Friday (Aug 26), a team of Post


Office and WHSmith representatives visited the sites in Aberystwyth, talked with Post Office staff, and in the evening held a public ‘consultation’ meeting in the Morlan Centre. On Saturday morning (Aug 27),


the Save Aberystwyth Post Office campaign again staged its regular picket of WHSmith. Elements of this action elicited an initially hostile response from shop managers who called the police. Ultimately, WHSmith staff and pickets engaged and a better mutual understanding was reached. The agenda of Tuesday evening’s


(Aug 30) meeting of Ceredigion People’s Assembly at the Black Lion in Llanbadarn Fawr was then dominated by the Post Office issue, with the group planning its next steps to resist the move.


FEISTY FRIDAY! The so-called ‘consultation’


meeting in the Morlan Centre on Friday evening was a feisty affair attended by more than sixty people. The consultative panel comprised two representative of Post Office Ltd., Stuart Taylor and Andy Wright, with Kevin Hogarth representing WHSmith. The meeting was chaired by Ceredigion MP Mark Williams who admitted his own bias, being unimpressed by the consultation process to date and staunchly in favour of maintaining full Crown Post Office services at the current site. Nevertheless, Mark Williams did a sterling job of making sure that as many voices as possible were heard in the meeting, giving the panel space to respond and, for the most part, maintaining a respectful order in quite a belligerent atmosphere. To his credit, Stuart Taylor,


Post Office Ltd.’s Head of External Relations Wales, Midlands and South, worked hard for his salary, fielding many difficult questions from the floor, though his answers did not often satisfy the assembled public. Stuart Taylor received occasional support from Kevin Hogarth from WHSmith while, after introducing himself, Andy Wright mostly sat with a fixed smile and rabbit-caught-in-the-headlights eyes. Stuart Taylor was adamant that the decision to move the Post Office has not yet been made: it was not a done deal with WHSmith. He also stated that WHSmith was the only company that had pursued an expression of interest that Post Office Ltd. invited in January. Contradicting previous reports, including some published in The Herald, Stuart Taylor insisted that, if indeed the move was made, the Post Office in WHSmith would continue to


Kelvin Mason Aberystwyth Reporter kelvin.mason@herald.email


provide all the current Crown services. In April this year, Post Office Ltd. announced plans to move up to 61 branches into WHSmith stores over the next year, including 39 Crown Post Offices.


THE BIG ISSUES A number of specific concerns


with the proposed move were raised on Friday. One set of concerns centred on the space available in the Terrace Road premises, whether the shop was big enough and fit for purpose as a Post Office. One audience member believed there was simply not enough room for a Post Office to function properly in WHSmith. He pointed out that shopping in the store was already a crowded and inconvenient experience, especially if your magazine of choice, Practical Woodworker or Model Engineer, say, was located on the bottom shelf of the magazine display and you had to crawl along the floor between people’s feet to find it! The issue of space took a more


serious turn as wheelchair users and sight-impaired members of the audience voiced their concerns about access to a Post Office located in WHSmith. The open letter from Roger Gale, General Manager of the Crown and WHSmith Network of Post Office Ltd., printed on glossy paper and made available at Friday’s meeting, specifies that the relocated Crown Post Office would be ‘to the rear of the WHSmith store’. Moth Foster, who is sight- impaired himself, believed it would be impossible to provide wide enough aisles in the store to grant unobstructed, safe and convenient access for sight- impaired people and those using wheelchairs. Unfortunately, Post Office Ltd.


had not published floor-plans for the redesigned WHSmith store. Brandishing his own plan on a single sheet of A4, Stuart Taylor claimed plans could not be made publically available for security reasons. Members of the audience responded that there were not many options about where to locate a Post Office counter in the rear of WHSmith, and they cast considerable doubt on whether that location would anyway be of much interest to international terrorist networks. Space was again the concern as


an audience member questioned how privacy could be maintained in such a small area for confidential matters such as banking, obtaining foreign currency and various licensing and insurance services. Mark Williams pressed the matter of the UKVI Biometric Enrolment Service which is essential to Aberystwyth as a university town that hosts international students. This service is also essential to asylum seekers whom, as a ‘Trailblazer Local


Saturday morning picket: Outside WHSmith


Authority’, Ceredigion is welcoming into the community. The Post Office Ltd. open letter helpfully informs customers that the nearest alternative for the Biometric Enrolment Service is Port Talbot, a four hour, 160 mile roundtrip by car. From the floor, Ceredigion AM Elin Jones pointed out that, since the demise of Lewis Coaches, there were no public transport options to get to Port Talbot besides an unfeasible ten-hour rail journey, typically costing more than £65 return. The open letter from Roger Gale states that ‘retaining the UKVI Biometric Enrolment Service at the proposed new branch will be subject to Home Office approval’, anticipating that, at least, that there may be an ‘interruption to the availability of this service’. To the audience’s vociferous approval, Mark Williams stated that any interruption at all in the service would be wholly unacceptable. Stuart Taylor acknowledged how important the issue was to the community, while Andy Wright’s fixed smile tightened almost imperceptibly. Maintaining the employment rights


of staff, their working conditions and rates of pay, along with recognition of their trade union, the Communication Workers Union (CWU), were issues that worried citizens assembled in the Morlan. For Post Office Ltd. Stuart Taylor pledged there would be no compulsory redundancies and that Post Office staff, a number of whom attended the meeting, would be employed in WHSmith, redeployed in the Post Office or offered voluntary redundancy. Kevin Hogarth gave his guarantee that WHSmith pay the National Living Wage announced by George Osborne last year. At £7.20 per hour, the National Living Wage replaced the £6.50 minimum wage. It should not be confused with the UK Living Wage, as promoted by the Living Wage Foundation, which is currently £8.25 an hour, though such confusion may have been the former Chancellor’s intention. Hogarth also denied that WHSmith use zero hours


contracts. However, Steve Clarke, Chief Executive of WHSmith, has admitted that they do use zero-hours contracts for staff who, he claims, request them. Kevin Hogarth did not know whether WHSmith recognised the CWU but he promised to find out and report back. The audience found this lack of knowledge passing strange from a representative of a company that has been franchising Post Office services since 2006. The Post Office Ltd. and WHSmith


spokesmen seemed to shoot themselves in the foot when they claimed that the new branch could simultaneously offer weekend opening by employing students and other casual staff who wished to work weekends, not forcing trained Post Office staff to work weekends, and maintaining professional Crown services. Elizabeth Morley was one of a number of speakers from the floor who wondered how it would be feasible to make the investment in training casual staff to provide complex financial and administrative services. Following this point and a number


of searching follow-up questions about employee rights from the Ceredigion Labour Party contingent at the meeting, the panel looked not a little abashed. A number of Town and County


Councillors attended the meeting, unanimously expressing their objection to the proposed move. Mark Williams paid Post Office Ltd. and WHSmith the back-handed compliment that not many things could bring Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru, the Labour Party and the Greens together in Ceredigion, but they had certainly managed it! Councillors Mark Strong and Talat Chaudri led the questioning of the panel on WHSmith’s poor record on the Welsh language. They did not accept the panel’s reassurances that Welsh language signage in the relocated branch would be maintained by WHSmith to the standards set by Post Office Ltd. in its own premises. On this issue, the councillors were ceded the moral high ground due to the fact that Post Office Ltd. had failed to arrange translation


services for the consultation meeting itself. On the issue of the WW1 memorial


plaque in the Great Darkgate Street premises, if the relocation goes ahead Post Office Ltd. has pledged to ‘work with Royal Mail to identify the most appropriate place to locate the memorial so that members of the public can continue to pay their respects to our colleagues who sacrificed their lives’. Stuart Taylor said they would work


with the Royal British Legion and the War Memorials Trust on the issue. If possible, he said, they also wanted to contact the families. The seven men commemorated on the brass plaque are: John Frederick Bird, Thomas Cartwright, John Richard Davies, Emlyn Mason Jones, David Davies Lewis, Maldwyn Richards and Arthur Williams. Further details of their lives and deaths can be found on the West Wales War Memorial Project website (www.wwwmp.co.uk/the-ceredigion- war-memorials/aberystwyth-post- office-war-memorial).


ONLY ONE OPTION AND NO CHOICE


Following Friday’s meeting in the


Morlan, Mark Williams pledged to meet with Post Office staff soon. He told The Herald: “I remain implacably opposed to the proposed move of the Aberystwyth Post Office. That I believe is the will of my constituents, certainly those who have contacted me or signed our cross-party petitions, and was certainly the view of Friday’s meeting when not one member of the public spoke in favour. If the Post Office consultation is indeed a consultation then these views must be fully acknowledged and the plans for this move dropped! The truth is that this ‘consultation’ cannot be described as such. There is only one option on offer, and no choice. A like it or lump it approach is not acceptable, not least because of the practicalities of the move.” Mark Williams


reiterated


‘legitimate concerns’ about the entitlements of the Welsh language, disability access, privacy, protecting the rights of Post Office staff, and relocating the war memorial plaque. He also remained very concerned about any ‘short interruption’ to the UKVI Biometric Enrolment Service. Finally, Mark Williams shared his worry that ‘the effect of the move will undermine the vibrancy of Great Darkgate Street’ as the town’s main thoroughfare, commercial and social heartbeat.


THE SINGING PICKETS On Saturday, from 11am to 1pm,


the Save Aberystwyth Post Office campaign staged its now regular picket of WHSmith in Terrace Road. The picket of around 20 people stood with colourful Ceredigion People’s Assembly and Ceredigion Labour Party


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