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Managing TCO for maximum ROI


SCC is committed to managing our clients’ total cost of ownership—or TCO. We believe software TCO is established long before we write a single line of code, and we consider this during the design process when the objectives of the software-relative to installation/implementation, user requirements, functionality, and ease-of-use- are determined. This is the foundation of SCC’s software development lifecycle. With this in mind, we begin our design/development and TCO management process with these three principles/standards:


Ÿ Develop systems with ease of use Ÿ Manage costs over the lifetime of the software


Ÿ Build data migration and integration into the product


Installation, setup, configuration, training, and ease-of-use will ultimately impact a client’s TCO in a far greater way than will the initial cost of purchase, and our clients participate in the design of our systems. SCC develops our laboratory and genetics software based in large part on user requirements gathered by our network of subject matter experts—allied healthcare and healthcare IT professionals themselves—who work directly with our clients. Common words and terminology used in the clinical laboratory environment by knowledgeable, trained, and experienced personnel create a familiar, friendly user interface. This development practice—combined with our experience and expertise—has placed SCC at the forefront of laboratory, genetics, blood services, and outreach information systems software development.


SCC’s streamlined workflows help clients do more in less time, thus decreasing costs and maximizing “tech time.” Implementing workflow changes in a clinical environment can be as challenging as the software implementation itself—and can have just as big an impact on the business. Too often, when a proper workflow assessment and analysis has not been performed, the new system tends to not yield the expected benefits.


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