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Something Is Abuzz In Oak Brook!


Oak Brook Park District’s 40-acre Dean Nature Sanctuary, 115 Canterberry Lane, features a unique combination of ecosystems native to Illinois including oak savannah, wetlands, ponds, and prairie habitats. New this year are five colonies of honeybees to the park.


Why We Are Adding Hives?


Even though Illinois is the nation’s top producer of pumpkins, a crop that depends on honeybees for pollination, the majority of the state’s agricultural land is used for corn and soybeans. Honeybees do not pollinate these plants, leaving the vast majority of the state’s farmland void of any significant sustenance for the insects, which may contribute to Colony Collapse Disorder in Illinois.


Above: Our hard working bees settle into the work of collecting pollen from native wildflowers.


OH! Bee Parks Honey


Oak Brook Park District, in conjunction with Sweet Comb Chicago and the Oak Brook Park District Foundation, is proud to make this hyper-local, native wildflower honey available to you. Oh! Bee Parks Honey will be available for purchase at the Family Recreation Center and Tennis Center. Watch www.obparks. org and www.obparksfoundation.org for more information.


The park district is working with Sweet Comb Chicago in establishing our apiary, or land for bees. According to Sweet Comb Chicago, micro apiaries like the one at the Nature Sanctuary give honeybees vital access to native and nutrient rich pollen necessary to maintaining healthy colonies.


Will there be honey?


When the hives have produced enough honey that it can be harvested without risking the health of the colony, the community will have the opportunity to purchase it through the Oak Brook Park District Foundation. The foundation will utilize the funding from honey sales to help enhance the growth and preservation of parks, open lands, and programming in Oak Brook.


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