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LAUNCH PAD [ new openings + refits ]


Shoryu Ramen T


he latest Shoryu Ramen, situated in Covent Garden and designed by Blenheim Design, is a lighter, brighter and bolder remix of the essential Shoryu elements. Te 18th century


Grade II* listed interior looks and feels diferent to all previous Shoryu sites, featuring exposed original brickwork, timber floors and hand glazed tiles as well as elements of zinc. Te space at the front of the restaurant is


dominated by a back illuminated bar serving sake, plum wine and Japanese whiskeys. To the rear, an original garden wall has been revealed, subtly lit and adorned with timber placques containing messages and well wishes written in Japanese script. Strategically positioned Sake shelves


compartmentalise the space to create intimate dining areas whilst elegant overhead wall lamps softly illuminate the tables. Te restaurant occupies the ground floor and


basement spaces, which have been in commercial use for many decades. Tis type of use, with many diferent occupiers, has led to the gradual loss of many of the original architectural features of the building. Blenheim Design have thankfully created a design that respects and celebrates the features that do remain.


“Exposing the characterful brickwork provides


an insight into the historic nature of the building, whereas the previous interiors revealed little of the building’s heritage.” said Maja Myall, founder and design director at Blenheim. Te restaurant was due to open in December


2015, however structurally weakened beams supporting the rest of the building were discovered during the exploration works, which needed strengthening and this process delayed the opening by six months. Maja Myall commented, “Te challenge was to rectify the structure whilst avoiding any further loss of the historic fabric. We worked closely with Camden Council’s Heritage department to ensure the most sympathetic solution.” It would, perhaps, have been easier to conceal


and not reveal the original walls. Given the modern Japanese theme of the venue, the ancient walls have little significance. But the decision to expose them as the main feature has paid off, they play an essential role in creating a warm and inviting atmosphere and are very much in keeping with the surrounding historic area of London, which helps to give the restaurant a sense of belonging. Shoryu Ramen, 35 Great Queen Street, London WC2. www.shoryuramen.com www.blenheimdesign.com


GS Magazine 9


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