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Kojawan B


reaking every possible rule about what Asian dining should look and feel like, turning design story- telling on its head while being steeped in references to popular art


and virtual iconography - KOJAWAN does not seem ‘authentic’ according to average Western expectations, yet it is filled with a multitude of genuine detail. So Henry Chebaane, the London based artist and designer, and Creative Director of Blue Sky Hospitality, calls the destination’s brand identity ‘genuinely inauthentic’. Te interior space experience conveys ‘real virtuality where the imaginary realm of digital culture is made into real and tangible sensations’. Himself a long time collector of pop art and


a frequent traveller to the Far East, Chebaane has layered the interiors of KOJAWAN into a retro-futuristic cosmopolitan stage : mixing European design vernaculars with the bold graphic worlds of KOrea, JApan and TaiWAN. Chebaane is a unique designer. He has an acute understanding of what components are required to deliver a commercially successful operation, and yet he has the imagination of an eccentric contemporary artist. Tis project has given him free rein to combine these skills and the end result is extraordinary.


14 GS Magazine Te bar and dining space is conceived as


a deliberate hybrid of genres, a simultaneous overlap of multiple periods, evoking a light science fiction film set juxtaposed with a luminous urban art gallery: Kubrick’s 2001 - a


Space Odyssey meets Warhol’s Silver Factory, with hints of seminal literature works from the likes of Philip K.Dick and Brian W. Aldiss and movies such as Alien and cult Japanese anime like Ghost in the Shell.


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