This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
By Matt Mickey BS Exercise Science, CPT


Mobility WHAT IS IT? Joint mobility is the ability to move


a limb throughout its full range of motion (ROM) within a joint(s), under control. Unlike flexibility, mobility is not passive and requires strength in order to produce full ROM move- ments. Flexibility is just one factor that affects the mobility of a joint.


WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? Mobility is essential for your body’s


adequate performance in both sport and life. It’s important to understand how to properly move your body throughout its’ many different ranges of motion in order to achieve and main- tain proper form during exercise and ADL. It is also crucial in injury prevention. Having the ability to properly move and control your body through space allows for safe and effective per- formance without increasing chance of bodily injury or harm. Balance and coordination are directly linked to mobility: the greater mobility and control an individual has, the easier it is to achieve balance, stability, and to move multiple body parts in unison.


HOW DO YOU IMPROVE IT? The same principle of flexibility applies to mobility: if you don’t use it, you lose it. The best way to maintain and improve mobil- ity is to move, and move often! If you are just beginning a program, first iden- tify


deep tissue massage’. This is usually pain- ful, but very effective at loosening up tight muscles and providing tremendous relief. • Mobility Drills – exercises geared spe- cifically around increasing range of motion about a joint(s).


• Static and Dynamic Stretching – involves breathing techniques for passive and active stretches designed to increase the mobility of specific joints.


Guidelines for mobility training • Choose exercises within your current limitations • Gradually increase your activity based on your current level, don’t go from 0-60


• Wear appropriate clothing, don’t limit your improvement by wearing clothing that restricts your movement • Stay consistent


Any questions or comments? Ask me anything, I’m always available for you! Matt Mickey BS Exercise Science, CPT Mmickey15@gmail.com requested LAFRA


subject line:


the areas that need the most


improvement. Common problem areas include the hips, back, shoulders, and knees. Next choose from a series of: • Foam Rolling Techniques – provides a myofascial release or ‘self-administered


Engineer Tim Aguayo (12-B) concentrates on squeezing his back muscles in the fully contracted position


August 2016 • 37


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64