This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
56 Good Reads I just love a good book! A hard


copy I can jump into bed with, eventually fall asleep and wake up with it by my side. One that teaches me something of signifi- cance. One that is not read only on a computer or tablet version. I have found that in a masterfully written and heart-string pulling book by Elizabeth Letts .


Ms. Letts is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Eighty-Dollar Champion as well as two novels, Quality of Care and Family Planning. A competitive equestrian in her youth, Letts rode for California in the North American Junior Three-Day Eventing Championships.


The book I am referring to is her latest work called “The Perfect Horse”. It is an historical account written in colorful detail of the plight of the prized Lipizzaner stallions during WWII. “The Perfect Horse” tells the story of the U.S. mission to rescue the priceless stallions kidnapped by the Nazi’s. While Hitler’s attempt to create an Aryan master race is well known,


his simultaneous effort to create and build an equine master race made up of the finest purebred horses is not. The year was 1945 and the Russian’s were closing in on the Third Reich from the east, the Allies from the west. Thanks to the courage and daring of an American colonel, an Austrian Olympian in charge of the famous Lipizzaner stallions, and the support of U.S. General George Patton, a risky and covert mission was planned to smuggle these endangered animals into safe territory against all odds and the disapproval of many who felt mere horses were not worth the risk of human lives to save. Not only will “The Perfect Horse” appeal to horse lovers everywhere but it will also appeal to history buffs as well. History and horses, two of my favorite things to read and learn about. I think you will feel the same way.


Published by Ballantine Books. Available in bookstores and online August 2016.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64