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19 swers


rse Rescue and The Medicine Horse Project, h trueCOWBOYmagazine.


tCm: When did you first begin rescuing horses? JS: I think every horse person has rescued or will rescue a horse along the way. There’s al- ways a horse in a neighbor’s backyard that deserves a better life and those of us who care enough try to do something. That’s what happened. Neighbors moved away leaving their horses in the backyard with no food or water. They showed up once a week, or less, with hay. I lived across the street and noticed this tragedy. One day I decided to go snoop and found their horses desperately skinny and chewing on baling twine. At that point my emo- tions took over and I stole them. Well I really just borrowed them so I could get some food and water in them. But I did remove them from that backyard. I left a note on the door of the home telling them where their horses were and when they finally showed up about a week later, I offered to buy the two starving horses for $100 each. That was it for me. That was my new beginning.


tCm: What motivated you to begin a non-profit horse rescue? JS: I was rescuing horses on a very small scale, out of my pocket, from my heart. In 1995 I adopted two mustangs from the Bureau of Land Management as a fun project. When I started learning about mustangs and the issues surrounding them I thought I needed to become a champion for them. Still it took a couple of years to really take the plunge into the non-profit world.


tCm: You founded LifeSavers Horse Rescue in Lancaster, California. How long has it been in operation? JS: I created Lifesavers, Inc. in July of 1997. So we are celebrating our 19th anniversary. Wow!


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