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CONGRATS TO SENATOR PETITCLERC


Canada’s most decorated Paralympic athlete has been appointed to the Canadian Senate. “Chantal Petitclerc is such a strong role model for all Canadians,” said Gaetan Tardif, President of the Canadian Paralympic Committee. “She is recognized around the world for her Paralympic achievements and her leadership both on and off the field of play.” Petitclerc will lead the Canadian contingent at the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio in September as Chef de Mission for Team Canada. “Her professionalism, passion and commitment to excellence has and will continue to have a positive impact on our Canadian athletes,” continued Tardif. “We are confident that she will carry these strong attributes into her new role as Senator.”


For more on the Canadian Paralympic Committee as it prepares for Rio 2016 visit www.disabilitytodaynetwork.com/canadian-paralympic-committee.


TANGLED ART GALLERY OPENS NEW DOORS


Tangled Arts + Dis- ability has opened Canada’s newest art gallery, the nation’s first to be exclusively dedicated to show- casing disability art. For the past 15


years, Tangled has been cultivating disability arts by assisting with artist development, exhibiting disability art in Toronto, and touring disability art across Ontario. The Tangled Art Gallery (TAG) will showcase the best of Canadian disability art and ad- vance accessible curatorial practices in exciting and innovative ways. TAG audiences can expect to engage with art that reshapes understandings of disability, encounter disability artists who invigorate the art world, and in- teract with inclusive technologies that reimagine how we experience art. “By centring audiences with disabil-


ities, TAG creates more innovative and interactive ways of engaging with art for everyone,” says Tangled’s Artistic Director, Eliza Chandler. “For example, being invited to engage with a ‘visual art’ exhibit through touch makes the


exhibit accessible. At the same time, this enhances the artistic engagement for all audiences accus- tomed to a pane of glass separating them from the work.” Constructed Iden- tities, TAG’s opening


exhibition by Persimmon Blackbridge, is a broad collection of small sculptural works created from wood, metal, and found objects, representing disability and bodily difference, as well as race and gender difference, as essential to the aesthetics of bodily forms. Con- structed Identities will be an inclusive artistic experience with all work hung at an accessible level, featuring an audio description track of each piece as well as tactile art – created for the audience to engage with through touch. “The arts landscape is changing,”


says Chandler, “and accessibility is a key factor in that change. Making arts and cultural spaces accessible to artists and audiences with disabilities is an essential move to stay relevant in today’s arts scene and TAG is leading that change.”


For videos, news, blogs and more from Tangled Arts + Disability check out www.disabilitytodaynetwork.com/tangled.


CHANGEIT!


Spinal Cord Injury Ontario is now a charity partner of ChangeIt! To show your support, all that you need to do is “round up.” You can automatically round up your electronic purchases and donate the difference! For a $2.82 coffee, for exam- ple, $0.18 will be rounded up and donated with a BMO Credit Card, RBC Credit Card or select Credit Union Debit Card. Want to take part? Go to https:// ca.changeit.com/registra- tion to get started. Select Spinal Cord Injury Ontario and set your rounding limits. Thanks for making “change” happen!


Check out www.disability todaynetwork.com/spinal- cord-injury-ontario for more on Spinal Cord Injury Ontario which is proudly supported by Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers.


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